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Open Filters

Eva and Franco Mattes (both born in Italy in 1976) are a duo of artists based in New York City. Since meeting in Berlin in 1994, they have never separated. Operating under the pseudonym 0100101110101101.org, they are counted among the pioneers of the Net Art movement and are renowned for their subversion of public media.[1] They produce art involving the ethical and political issues arising from the inception of the Internet. The work investigates the fabrication of situations, where fact and fiction merge into one. They are based in Brooklyn, New York, but also travel frequently throughout Europe and the United States.[1]

Manfred Mohr is considered a pioneer of digital art based on algorithms. After discovering Prof. Max Bense's information aesthetics in the early 1960's, Mohr's artistic thinking was radically changed. Within a few years, his art transformed from abstract expressionism to computer generated algorithmic geometry. Further encouraged by discussions with the computer music composer Pierre Barbaud whom he met in 1967, Mohr programmed his first computer drawings in 1969. Since then all his artwork is produced exclusively with the computer. Mohr develops and writes algorithms for his visual ideas. Since 1973, he generates 2-D semiotic graphic constructs using multidimensional hypercubes. [1]

References: 1. https://www.emohr.com/
School for Poetic Computation School for Poetic Computation

School for Poetic Computation. Spring 2018

School for Poetic Computation is an artist run school in New York that was founded in 2013. A small group of students and faculty work closely to explore the intersections of code, design, hardware and theory — focusing especially on artistic intervention. It’s a hybrid of a school, residency and research group.Our motto is: more poetry, less demo [1]

The school for poetic computation is organized around exploring the creative and expressive nature of computational approaches to art and design. The school approaches writing code like creative writing — focusing on the mechanics of programming, the demystification of tools, and hacking the conventions of art-making with computation.[2]

We value the craft necessary to realize an idea, recognizing that every writer needs space and time to hone their trade. Our school aims to provide a safe haven for you to get acquainted with the craft of coding at your own pace, make it your own, and investigate the space between creative process and craft. This takes conversations with colleagues and the right push at the right time.[2]

The school aims to be more than a technical bootcamp. It is an opportunity to work intensively with a small group of students, faculty, and artists to explore questions about the poetics of computation. For us, computation is poetic when technology is used for critical thinking and aesthetic inquiry – a space where logic meets electricity (hardware), math meets language (software) and analytical thinking meets creative experimentation.[2]

This is also a school for teaching. Every student who comes here will be asked to share their expertise with their classmates in the form of workshops and outreach.[2]

The goal of the school is to promote completely strange, whimsical, and beautiful work – not the sorts of things useful for building a portfolio for finding a job, but the sort of things that will surprise and delight people and help you to keep creating without a job. However, employers tell us they appreciate this kind of work as well.[2]

This is not a program to get a degree, there are large programs for that. This is not a program to go for vocational skills, there are programs for that. This is a program for self initiated learners who want to explore new possibilities. This is a program for thinkers in search of a community to realize greater dreams.[2]

Peter Burr is an artist from Brooklyn specializing in animation and installation. Using computer animation to create images and environments that hover on the boundary between abstraction and figuration, Burr has in recent years devoted himself to exploring the concept of an endlessly mutating labyrinth. Existing as stand-alone pieces, much of his work is also in the process of expanding into a video game through the support of Creative Capital and Sundance. Previously, he worked under the alias Hooliganship, and in 2006 founded the video label Cartune Xprez, through which he produced hundreds of live multimedia exhibitions and touring programs showcasing a multi-generational group of artists at the forefront of experimental animation. Here he discusses ways to stay healthy as a creator, what it means to make art in the digital realm, and the plant-like possibilities of games.[1]

Natalie Jeremijenko (born 1966) is an artist and engineer whose background includes studies in biochemistry, physics, neuroscience and precision engineering. She is an active member of the net.art movement, and her work primarily explores the interface between society, the environment and technology. She has alternatively described her work as "X Design" (short for experimental design) and herself as a "thingker", a combination of thing-maker and thinker. She is currently an associate professor at New York University in the Visual Art Department, and has affiliated faculty appointments in the school's Computer Science and Environmental Studies.[1] She directs the Environmental Health Clinic at New York University, which is modeled on the health clinic model, but offers patients prescriptions not for pharmaceuticals but for art, design and participatory projects. [2]

Tabor Robak A* (2014) Tabor Robak A* (2014) Tabor Robak Blossom (2018) Tabor Robak Where's My Water (2015) Tabor Robak Butterfly Room (2015)
Xenix (2013)
Quantaspectra at Team Gallery NYC
SI: Visions | Tabor Robak on Video Games

Tabor Robak is an American artist working in video art and electronics including live-rendering 3D graphics and custom built PC graphics installations.

Robak's early works consisted of 3D interactive environments, to be accessed on the artist's website. These pieces, which the artist described as having a "desktop screensaver aesthetic," sought to isolate digital space as a fact, an abstracted, alternate reality. Robak's work explores the visual vocabulary of modern video games, advertising and animated film, to examine societal perceptions of the digital and the real.[1]

Babycastles mission is to amplify the diversity of voices in videogame culture by providing artists support to actualize ideas and expose that work to new audiences.[1]

Drawing values from our history in New York’s DIY scene, Babycastles provides an open, accessible and collaborative platform for sharing experimental work across a broad community of artists, musicians, writers, technologists, gamemakers, students, organizers, activists, researchers, chefs, scientists, teachers, animators, zinemakers, filmmakers, moms, modders, curators, speedrunners, builders, journalists, storytellers, comedians, poets, dancers, LARPers, playwrights, Wikipedia editors, botmakers, programmers, performers, algorithms, AI…[1]

The Babycastles art collective began in 2010, roaming between locations throughout New York but usually showcasing events and exhibits at Silent Barn in Brooklyn. After settling into a permanent Chelsea home in 2014, the collective could host musical performances as well as more frequent revolving art shows.[2]

The concerts included all genres—lots of electronic and chiptune acts, but sometimes more obscure, self-proclaimed “nerdy” acts like The Doubleclicks too. It’s not just music either. The venue puts on poetry readings and live theater as well, like the immersive fantasy musical The Universe is a Small Hat. To top it off, Babycastles functions as a coworking space during daytime hours.[2]

Established in 2004, Secret Project Robot is a 501c3 not for profit artist run art space with a gallery which hosts art installations, music, performance art, gatherings, happenings, craft nights, parties, dj's and much more. In 2017, the founders and co-conspirators created a new bar and hangout within Secret Project Robot to help fund the space and employee artists. [1]

VISION

Secret Project Robot aims to integrate and overlap all the arts into a fluid, artful, casual, friendly environment, to create a perpetual happening and a kind of house party that is run and supported by the people participating.

Secret Project Robot seeks to build a strong artist, musician, and intellectual community as a tangible way to mitigate the feelings of alienation brought on by tyranny and a failing world order created by the neo-liberal capitalist system.

Secret Project Robot desires to be a fully self sustaining artist run art space. Using sales from the Bar we are aiming to create a new way to run and communally finance an art space and art. [1]

Founded in 2001, bitforms gallery represents established, mid-career, and emerging artists critically engaged with new technologies. Spanning the rich history of media art through its current developments, the gallery’s program offers an incisive perspective on the fields of digital, internet, time-based, and new media art forms. [1]

Supporting and advocating for the collection of ephemeral, time-based, and digital art works since its founding, bitforms gallery artists are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; Center for Art and Media (ZKM), Karlsruhe; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul, among other institutions internationally.

Claudia Hart (born 1955 in New York, NY) is an artist and associate professor in the Department of Film, Video, New Media, Animation at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. She is represented by bitforms gallery, New York. Hart has been active as an artist, curator and critic since 1988. She creates virtual representations that take the form of 3D imagery integrated into photography, animated loops and multi-channel animation installations. [1]

Hart's work applies a feminist perspective to a discussion of digital technology and a critique of the media. Much of her work attempts to introduce women into a male-dominated technological culture and condemn the violent impulses of a masculine digital production environment. In her artist statement, Hart says, "By creating virtual images that are sensual but not pornographic within mechanized, clockwork depictions of the natural, I try to subvert earlier dichotomies of woman and nature pitted against a civilized, "scientific" and masculine world of technology. In my own way, I am staging a romantic rebellion against technocratic and bureaucratic culture." [1]