foundyou.online /about
Open Filters

foundyou.online is a directory for new media art. You can browse artists, artworks, organizations, and events. You can also search by location, and sort by tag or decade.

I/O/D represents the coming together of Matthew Fuller, Colin Green, and Simon Pope. The group began their Web activism in 1994, with multimedia presentations via floppy disk. Their work became infamous for engulfing a computer, reducing it to a frustrating series of seemingly random generated dialogue boxes that would often crash the system. Soon after, I/O/D made the Web its target with The Web Stalker. A new type of browser, The Web Stalker offered a completely different interface for moving through pages on the World Wide Web. The user opens a URL, then watches as the "Stalker" blows open the structure and source code for that Web site, stripping the site of all content and design, and leaving only a two-dimensional mnemonic showing a skeletal map of how the Web is linked together. [1]

I/O/D 4: The Web Stalker was a new kind of web browser that decomposed websites into separate sets of entities. The texts of the site were treated as the primary resource, but were stripped of most of their formatting. Links from one file to another were mapped in a network diagram, which allowed users to visualize their path through the clusters, skeins, and aporias of files. This Map built dynamically as a Crawler function gradually moved through the network. We saw the logical structure of websites, established by the links in and between them, as another key resource, and we wanted the software to act in a modular manner, with users calling up functions, each with their own separate window, only when they needed them. [2]

Stan Vanderbeek Stan VanDerBeek in front of his environmental movie theatre Movie-Drome at Stoney Point, New York, c. 1966

Stan VanDerBeek (January 6, 1927 – September 19, 1984) was an American experimental filmmaker known for his collage works. [1]

A pioneer in the development of experimental film and live-action animation techniques, Stan VanDerBeek achieved widespread recognition in the American avant-garde cinema. An advocate of the application of a utopian fusion of art and technology, he began making films in 1955. In the 1960s, he produced theatrical, multimedia pieces and computer animation, often working in collaboration with Bell Telephone Laboratories. In the 1970s, he constructed a 'Movie Drome' in Stony Point, New York, which was an audiovisual laboratory for the projection of film, dance, magic theater, sound and other visual effects. His multimedia experiments included movie murals, projection systems, planetarium events and the exploration of early computer graphics and image-processing systems.[1]

VanDerBeek wrote: It is imperative that we quickly find some way for the entire level of world human understanding to rise to a new human scale. The scale is the world' The risks are the life or death of this world. The technological explosion of this last half-century, and the implied future are overwhelming, man is running the machines of his own invention… while the machine that is man… runs the risk of running wild. Technological research, development, and involvement of the world community has almost completely out-distanced the emotional-sociological (socio-'logical') comprehension of this technology. The 'technique-power' and 'culture-over-reach' that is just beginning to explode in many parts of the earth, is happening so quickly that it has put the logical fulcrum of man’s intelligence so far outside himself that he cannot judge or estimate the results of his acts before he commits them. The process of life as an experiment on earth has never been made clearer. It is this danger — that man does not have time to talk to himself — that man does not have the means to talk to other men. The world hangs by a thread of verbs and nouns. Language and cultural-semantics are as explosive as nuclear energy. It is imperative that we (the world’s artists) invent a new world language…'[1]

Cornelia Sollfrank is an artist who pioneered Net Art and Cyberfeminism in the 1990s.

In 1997 Sollfrank hacked the "world's first" net art competition, Extension, organized by the Hamburg Art Museum in Germany. Her work titled Female Extension involved the creation of 289 computer-generated websites created by combing the Internet and combining fragments of HTML into exquisite corpse-like websites. Each website was submitted under the name of a different artificial female artist. No women were awarded prizes, but press releases distributed by Sollfrank received widespread attention for her intervention, overshadowing the gallery's own awards.

Cornelia Sollfrank founded the organization Old Boys Network. In 1997, it organized the Cyberfeminist International at documenta x in Kassel, Germany. Old Boys Network published First Cyberfeminist International in 1998 followed by next Cyberfeminist International in 1999. Closely associated with Cyberfeminism, Sollfrank has expressed reservations that it limits the perception of her work as "womens issues". [1]

Since its foundation in 1996, C³ has focused its energies on fostering the integration of new technologies in the social and cultural tradition. In order that the new technologies be socially accepted, appropriated and largely employed, familiarity with models furnished by creative science as well as experimental avant-garde art and the creation of a novel, inspirational content are essential. C³ provides an ideal framework for all of this as a space for innovative experiments and initiatives, a site for free research and communication, active exchange of information, creative and educational work, and applied artistic imagination.[1]

C³ is an institution concerned with prevailing innovation, and supports and develops projects that do not serve direct commercial interests, often precisely because their uncommon, novel comprehension does not necessarily allow for hopes of market support. It is with this end in view that C³ is a public institution, its focuses pointing beyond daily topicality and the profit-oriented sphere, and rather toward intellectual capital and sensual values. The goal of the C³ Foundation is, in preserving the framework of successful operation, and undertaking the assets accumulated until now, to respond appropriately to new challenges, and to offer a suitable answer to the questions of the transformation of global communications.[1]

The C3 Collection contains media artworks that have been realised with the collaboration of C3, on-line artworks, works produced within the framework of the C3 residency programme and the Studio Grant, as well as the documentation of projects realised by C3. Also featuring in the compilation are those artworks produced by C3 which were presented to the public in larger exhibitions or in the C3 Gallery, for which their Internet appearance was not their primary medium.[2]

An important element of the operations of C³ is the preparation of publications, in the sense of both printed and electronic published materials. C³'s art journal was launched on the web in 2000 under the title Exindex (http://exindex.c3.hu/), in which up-to-the-minute information is provided on the Hungarian art scene, with a gallery listing, interviews, complete artists portfolios, and also guidelines and calls for Hungarian and international art-related grant opportunities.[3]

Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD-Rom, DVD-Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.[1]

Emphasizing multimedia artworks that reflect digital extensions of twentieth-century developments in cinema, video, installation, photography, and sound, holdings include extensive special collections in American and Chinese new media arts, significant online and offline holdings in internet art, and the majority of works in the international exhibition, Contact Zones: The Art of CD-Rom.[1]

The curatorial vision emphasizes digital interfaces and artistic experimentation by international, independent artists. Designed as an experimental center of research and creativity, the Goldsen Archive includes materials by individual artists and collaborates on conceptual experimentation and archival strategies with international curatorial and fellowship projects.[2]

Société is an exhibition platform founded in 2015 and situated the former electricity factory “Société Bruxelloise d’Électricité” built in the 1930s in the Tour and Taxi neighborhood. It is initiated, directed and curated by the artist couple Manuel Abendroth and Els Vermang, of the artis trio LAb[au].[1]

As an artist run space, Société pursuits a non-commercial activity, promoting a dialogue between artists on current artistic issues. Through two thematic exhibitions a year, they explore the field of contemporary artistic research while taking into account new forms of artistic expression and new technologies which support them. Their exhibitions contextualize these reflections in an artistic continuity, connecting different generations of artists while also promoting the Belgian scene.[1]

Jack Straw Cultural Center is the Northwest's only non-profit multidisciplinary audio arts center. A community-based resource since 1962, we provide a production facility that is unlike any other in the region for local artists who work creatively with sound. Jack Straw focuses on annual artist residencies through our Artist Support Program, our Writers Program, and our Gallery Residency Program; art and technology education for all ages; arts and heritage partnerships; and radio and podcast production. Our full-service recording studio is also available for a range of arts projects.[1]

Mission

Jack Straw Cultural Center exists to foster the communication of arts, ideas, and information to diverse audiences through audio media. We provide creation and production opportunities in audio media, including radio, theater, film, video, music, and literature. Dedicated to the production and presentation of all forms of audio art, Jack Straw 1) produces high quality, innovative audio presentations; 2) commissions independent artists of all disciplines to create sound and audio productions; 3) provides arts and technology education programs for youth and adults; 4) collaborates with arts and heritage organizations to integrate sound and music into their programs; and 5) presents audio productions through events, exhibits, radio, film and the internet.[1]

Jack Straw New Media Gallery

The Jack Straw New Media Gallery opened in 1999 to support artists working with visual and installation art, with an emphasis on sound. The Gallery is one feature of the New Media Gallery Program, and is one of three residency programs at Jack Straw. The New Media Gallery exhibits artists' work through an open call process like the Artist Support Program and Writers Program. As one of a handful of exclusively sound art spaces in the world, it has been attracting applicants nationally and internationally, however Jack Straw has a commitment to local artists.[2]

Gallery residencies include an exhibition of up to three months in the gallery; 20 hours of studio assistance with one of our engineers; access to Jack Straw Cultural Center's audio recording, production, and presentation equipment; two public events - the opening and an artist talk; and an interview podcast. This residency is for exhibiting and performing artists in any medium who would like to incorporate sound into their work.[2]

The Palais de Tokyo (Palace of Tokyo) is a building dedicated to modern and contemporary art, located at 13 avenue du Président-Wilson, near the Trocadéro, in the 16th arrondissement of Paris. The eastern wing of the building belongs to the City of Paris, and hosts the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris). The western wing belongs to the French state and since 2002 has hosted the Palais de Tokyo / Site de création contemporaine, the largest museum in France dedicated to temporary exhibitions of contemporary art. [1]

Dedicated to both emerging and established artists from France and around the world, the Palais de Tokyo’s programming is punctuated by thematic and monographic exhibitions, large-scale artistic interventions, and carte blanche invitations to artists who take over the entirety of the space. Each season is accompanied by completely new transformations within the Palais, as artists welcome visitors into the heart of their practice, renewing their relationship to art. [2]

Open to all disciplines and with the ambition to explore all realms of artistic expression – from performance to fashion to arts and crafts and more – Palais de Tokyo has also developed a cultural program at the intersection of movement, sound, and language, and in 2015 launched the annual “DO DISTURB” festival. [2]

Synchronicity is an art gallery but in practice it is so much more. It is located in East Hollywood in Los Angeles, CA. Its doors are open to a community of contemporary thinkers whose goal is to make thoughtful and intelligent work never limiting themselves to a specific medium. We host exhibitions, screenings, performances, and parties. Staying active within the community and also bringing others into it remains the most important goal of the space.[1]

The SPEED SHOW exhibition series was conceived by the artist Aram Bartholl in June 2010. The basic idea of this exhibition format is to create a gallery like opening situation for browser based internet art in a public cyber-cafe or internet-shop for one night. The exhibition format is free and can be applied by anyone at any place. (See how to instructions)[1]

The SPEED SHOW exhibition format:

Hit an Internet-cafe, rent all computers they have and run a show on them for one night. All art works of the participating artists need to be online (not necessarily public) and are shown in a typical browser with standard plug-ins. Performance and live pieces may also use pre-installed communication programs (instant messaging, VOIP, video chat, etc). Custom software (except browser add-ons) or offline files are not permitted. Any creative physical modification to the Internet cafe itself is not allowed. The show is public and takes place during normal opening hours of the Internet cafe/shop. All visitors are welcome to join the opening, enjoy the art (and to check their email).[1]