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foundyou.online is a directory for new media art. You can browse artists, artworks, organizations, and events. You can also search by location, and sort by tag or decade.

CultureHub is a global art and technology community that was born out of decades of collaboration between La MaMa and the Seoul Institute of the Arts, Korea’s first contemporary performing arts school. These two visionary institutions sought to explore how the internet and digital technologies could foster a more sustainable model for international exchange and creativity. [1]

Since its founding in 2009, CultureHub has grown into a global network with studios in New York, Los Angeles, Korea, Indonesia, and Italy, providing connected environments for artists to critically examine our evolving relationship to technology. Through residencies, live productions, and educational programming, CultureHub advances the work of artists experimenting with emerging technologies in search of new artistic forms. CultureHub builds new partnerships that expand our network and provide increased access to online and offline platforms that fuel artist mobility, create opportunities for cultural exchange, and broaden human understanding through the convergence of art, technology, and education. [1]

National Sawdust’s mission is rooted in music discovery that is open, inclusive, and based in active mentorship of emerging artists, while building new audiences and communities of music devotees.[1]

National Sawdust engages artists in an ecosystem of incubation to dissemination, programming groundbreaking new music in our state-of-the-art Williamsburg venue, and developing and touring new, collaborative music-driven projects — the National Sawdust DNA produces and presents world-class artistic work which embraces a wide stylistic approach to music. [1]

Tag
Post-Internet Art

Post-Internet refers to a current trend in art and criticism concerned with the impact of the Internet on art and culture. Taking cues from the understanding of Postmodernism as a reaction to or rejection of Modernism, post-Internet does not imply a time “after” the Internet but rather a time “about” the Internet. While Net Art of the late 1990s used the Internet primarily as a medium, post-Internet practices use both online and offline formats to engage with digital culture, corporate culture, and the effects of ubiquitous networking.[1]

From https://thewrong.org/about:

the wrong was born in 2o13 as a collaborative effort to create and promote digital art & culture, launching a global art biennale open to participation, happening both online & offline

“counting its viewership in the millions, the wrong just might be the world’s largest art biennale — the digital world’s answer to venice” - the new york times

since 2o13, more than 55oo artists and curators have officially participated in the wrong biennale

in march 2o2o, following the end of the 4th edition & in the midst of the covid19 pandemic outbreak

the wrong announces its next biennale editions for november 1st, 2o21, november 1st, 2o23 and november 1st, 2o25

and adds two complementary strains:

the wrong website new daily feed of contemporary digital art & culture links

the wrong tv new online tv platform for digital art, music & culture. 24/7 free live streaming

in april 2o2o, aware of the unavoidable digital migration of degree shows for the upcoming 2o2o class of art students around the world, the wrong introduces

the wrong degree show an annual online exhibition, open to participation, to showcase degree shows by graduating art students of schools and universities around the world

The Link Art Center is a curatorial platform promoting contemporary artistic research and critical reflections on the core issues of the information age: it organizes events, publishes books, collaborates and networks with individuals, groups, companies, institutions on a local and international level.[1]

Founded on March 9, 2011 as “Link Center for the Arts of Information Age” by Fabio Paris, Lucio Chiappa and Domenico Quaranta, joined by Matteo Cremonesi in 2014, the Link Art Center acted as a curatorial platform focused on the promotion of contemporary artistic research and critical reflections on the core issues of the information age, through the organization of events, editorial activity, collaboration and networking with individuals, groups, companies and institutions on a local and international level.[2]

Link Cabinet was a single web page hosting solo shows where artists exhibited a single, site-specific artwork. A project by Matteo Cremonesi for the Link Art Center (2014 - 2019) [3]

A publishing initiative of the Link Art Center, Link Editions uses the print on demand (POD) approach, which allows to reduce production costs and environmental impact of publishing to the minimum, and to circulate editorial products online. Edited by Domenico Quaranta, from 2011 to 2018 Link Editions published fifty books.[1]

Link Editions is a publishing initiative of the LINK Center for the Arts of the Information Age. LINK Editions uses the print on demand approach to create an accessible, dynamic series of essays, pamphlets, catalogues and artist books. A keen advocate of the idea that information wants to be free, Link Editions releases its contents free of charge in .pdf format, and on paper at a price accessible to all. Link Editions is a not-for-profit initiative and all its contents are circulated under a Creative Commons license.[4]

Crank the Web
Crank The Web by Jonah Brucker-Cohen

Crank the Web is a browser that allows people to physically crank their bandwidth in order to see a website. Simply enter a URL, start cranking, and text and images appear in the browser window. The idea behind Crank the Web is to combine ancient forms of automation with today’s digital telecommunications technology. All bandwidth should be free and everyone should have access to the fastest speed connection. It is up to you to physically crank your bandwidth so that your internet connection will rely on your personal strength, not personal wealth.[1]

I/O/D represents the coming together of Matthew Fuller, Colin Green, and Simon Pope. The group began their Web activism in 1994, with multimedia presentations via floppy disk. Their work became infamous for engulfing a computer, reducing it to a frustrating series of seemingly random generated dialogue boxes that would often crash the system. Soon after, I/O/D made the Web its target with The Web Stalker. A new type of browser, The Web Stalker offered a completely different interface for moving through pages on the World Wide Web. The user opens a URL, then watches as the "Stalker" blows open the structure and source code for that Web site, stripping the site of all content and design, and leaving only a two-dimensional mnemonic showing a skeletal map of how the Web is linked together. [1]

I/O/D 4: The Web Stalker was a new kind of web browser that decomposed websites into separate sets of entities. The texts of the site were treated as the primary resource, but were stripped of most of their formatting. Links from one file to another were mapped in a network diagram, which allowed users to visualize their path through the clusters, skeins, and aporias of files. This Map built dynamically as a Crawler function gradually moved through the network. We saw the logical structure of websites, established by the links in and between them, as another key resource, and we wanted the software to act in a modular manner, with users calling up functions, each with their own separate window, only when they needed them. [2]

Stan Vanderbeek Stan VanDerBeek in front of his environmental movie theatre Movie-Drome at Stoney Point, New York, c. 1966

Stan VanDerBeek (January 6, 1927 – September 19, 1984) was an American experimental filmmaker known for his collage works. [1]

A pioneer in the development of experimental film and live-action animation techniques, Stan VanDerBeek achieved widespread recognition in the American avant-garde cinema. An advocate of the application of a utopian fusion of art and technology, he began making films in 1955. In the 1960s, he produced theatrical, multimedia pieces and computer animation, often working in collaboration with Bell Telephone Laboratories. In the 1970s, he constructed a 'Movie Drome' in Stony Point, New York, which was an audiovisual laboratory for the projection of film, dance, magic theater, sound and other visual effects. His multimedia experiments included movie murals, projection systems, planetarium events and the exploration of early computer graphics and image-processing systems.[1]

VanDerBeek wrote: It is imperative that we quickly find some way for the entire level of world human understanding to rise to a new human scale. The scale is the world' The risks are the life or death of this world. The technological explosion of this last half-century, and the implied future are overwhelming, man is running the machines of his own invention… while the machine that is man… runs the risk of running wild. Technological research, development, and involvement of the world community has almost completely out-distanced the emotional-sociological (socio-'logical') comprehension of this technology. The 'technique-power' and 'culture-over-reach' that is just beginning to explode in many parts of the earth, is happening so quickly that it has put the logical fulcrum of man’s intelligence so far outside himself that he cannot judge or estimate the results of his acts before he commits them. The process of life as an experiment on earth has never been made clearer. It is this danger — that man does not have time to talk to himself — that man does not have the means to talk to other men. The world hangs by a thread of verbs and nouns. Language and cultural-semantics are as explosive as nuclear energy. It is imperative that we (the world’s artists) invent a new world language…'[1]