foundyou.online /about
Open Filters

foundyou.online is a directory for new media art. You can browse artists, artworks, organizations, and events. You can also search by location, and sort by tag or decade.

Established by artists in 1968, SPACE runs 20 artist studio buildings across 7 London boroughs and Colchester, providing affordable creative workspace plus support programmes, such as exhibitions, artists residencies, bursaries and training opportunities, to enable artists to be sustainable. SPACE also delivers Learning projects for schools, young people and communities neighbouring SPACE studio sites, to promote engagement with creativity and the arts.[1]

SPACE Art + Technology provides a test ground and critical exchange platform for artists and thinkers whose work engages with technology. We do this by offering artists residencies as well as regular events and workshops, enabling the public to gain a deeper insight into the challenges and opportunities that technology presents us with today.[2]

RTMark (derived from "Registered Trademark") is an activist collective that subverts the "Corporate Shield" protecting US corporations.

RTMark is itself a registered corporation which brings together activists who plan projects with donors who fund them. It thus operates outside the laws governing human individuals, and benefits from the much looser laws governing corporation. [1]

What does ®TMark do?

®TMark receives project ideas from internet users, then lists them (here). Each listed project has its own discussion list (linked from the project). When a project requires a bit of funding to be accomplished, sometimes investors will step up to the plate and offer their help. Even more often, people will offer non-financial help or feedback.

How is ®TMark defined, in legal terms?

®TMark is a brokerage that benefits from «limited liability» just like any other corporation; using this principle, ®TMark supports the sabotage (informative alteration) of corporate products, from dolls and children's learning tools to electronic action games, by channelling funds from investors to workers for specific projects grouped into "mutual funds."

So ®TMark is just a corporation?

®TMark is indeed just a corporation, and benefits from corporate protections, but unlike other corporations, its ‹bottom line› is to improve culture, rather than its own pocketbook; it seeks cultural profit, not financial. [2]

etoy.CORPORATION, an art group registered as a Swiss corporation, has been using internationally standardized (physical, virtual, legal and technical) containers to construct a global corporate sculpture since 1994. This "corporate sculpture" serves no purpose other than art - that is, the reflection of contemporary culture and its critical interaction with it.[1]

etoy.CORPORATION is art and invests all resources in the production of art beyond traditional dimensions. The aim is to take the resources, tools and legal framework of our time to create a corporate sculpture - a shareholder company registered in Zug/Switzerland that has no other purpose than cultural value. The privately held company etoy.CORPORATION SA issues etoy.SHARES (more information) to compensate its artists, investors, collectors and supporters. etoy.VENTURE association was founded 1994 and is registered in Zurich. This non-profit organization operates etoy.TANK-PLANTS in various cities, takes care of etoy.SOCIAL-ACTIVITIES, runs etoy.DAY-CARE and establishes MISSION ETERNITY - a digital cult of the dead. [2]

In the years 1999 to 2001, there was also a brand and domain name conflict with the American company eToys Inc., which became the largest online toy retailer during the boom years and reached a peak market value of around 10 billion US dollars. The fight for the rights to etoy.IDENTITY went down in history as a "TOYWAR" and is now part of textbooks. More than 400 international media have reported (from the New York Times and CNN, Art in America, to the Wall Street Journal). The group etoy has rejected very high financial offers of the counterparty precisely because the defense and preservation of the abstract identity container (TRADE MARK) in the case of etoy is much more important than the identity of the individual agents.[1]

From julianoliver.com:

Julian Oliver is a New Zealander, Critical Engineer and artist based in Berlin. His work and lectures have been presented at many museums, galleries, international electronic-art events and conferences, including the Tate Modern, Transmediale, the Chaos Computer Congress, Ars Electronica, FILE and the Japan Media Arts Festival. Julian has received several awards, most notably the distinguished Golden Nica at Prix Ars Electronica 2011 for the project Newstweek (with Daniil Vasiliev). He is the co-author of the Critical Engineering Manifesto and co-founder of Crypto Party in Berlin, who’s shared studio Weise7 hosted the first three crypto-parties worldwide. He is also the co-founder of BLACKLIST, a screening and panel series focused on the primary existential threats of our time.

Vuk Ćosić (born July 31, 1966 in Belgrade) is a Slovenian contemporary artist associated with the net.art movement. Active in politics, literature and art, Ćosić has exhibited, published, and been active since 1994. He is well known for his challenging, ground-breaking work as a pioneer in the field of net.art. His constantly evolving oeuvre is characterized by an interesting mix of philosophical, political, and conceptual network-related issues on the one hand, and an innovative feeling for contemporary urban and underground aesthetics on the other. One of the pioneers of net.art, Ćosić became deeply interested in ASCII code during a long period of research (1996–2001) on low-tech aesthetics, the economy, ecology and archaeology of the media, on the intersections between text and computer code, on the use of spaces in information, its fluid nature and infinite convertibility. Out of this came History of Art for the Blind, ASCII Unreal (an art game), ASCII Camera, ASCII Architecture, Deep ASCII and ASCII History of Moving Images, a history of the cinema converted into text format. He is a co-founder of Nettime, Syndicate, 7-11, and Ljubljana Digital Media Lab. [1]

After the golden days of net.art, he decided to become an ASCII artist. Why ASCII? For several reasons: because it existed before computing; not everyone takes it seriously, it's rather ugly (won't be recuperated by the art world very easily) and it's sexy (infected by hacker virus).[2]

Vuk Cosic was the Slovenian representative to the Venice Biennale in 2001, he’s the co-founder of Ljudmila — a digital media lab for artists in Slovenia and of the ASCII Art Ensemble and of course he’s a pioneer in the field of net.art. He gained the notoriety for having copied the DocumentaX website in 1997. After the art event closed, the website was set to shut down. And it did closed, but not before Cosic copied it. And it’s still up.[3]

Tag
ASCII Art

Established in 2004, Secret Project Robot is a 501c3 not for profit artist run art space with a gallery which hosts art installations, music, performance art, gatherings, happenings, craft nights, parties, dj's and much more. In 2017, the founders and co-conspirators created a new bar and hangout within Secret Project Robot to help fund the space and employee artists. [1]

VISION

Secret Project Robot aims to integrate and overlap all the arts into a fluid, artful, casual, friendly environment, to create a perpetual happening and a kind of house party that is run and supported by the people participating.

Secret Project Robot seeks to build a strong artist, musician, and intellectual community as a tangible way to mitigate the feelings of alienation brought on by tyranny and a failing world order created by the neo-liberal capitalist system.

Secret Project Robot desires to be a fully self sustaining artist run art space. Using sales from the Bar we are aiming to create a new way to run and communally finance an art space and art. [1]

Whitney Artport Whitney Artport Ursula Endlicher, Light and Dark Networks, 2011.
Hear from curator Christiane Paul and artists Mendi and Keith Obadike, Andy Deck, and Katherine Moriwaki and Jonah Brucker-Cohen about the history of net art at the Whitney Museum.

Artport is the Whitney Museum's portal to Internet art and an online gallery space for commissions of net art and new media art. Originally launched in 2001, Artport provides access to original art works commissioned specifically for Artport by the Whitney, documentation of net art and new media art exhibitions at the Whitney, and new media art in the Museum's collection. [1]

Founded in 2001, bitforms gallery represents established, mid-career, and emerging artists critically engaged with new technologies. Spanning the rich history of media art through its current developments, the gallery’s program offers an incisive perspective on the fields of digital, internet, time-based, and new media art forms. [1]

Supporting and advocating for the collection of ephemeral, time-based, and digital art works since its founding, bitforms gallery artists are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; Center for Art and Media (ZKM), Karlsruhe; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul, among other institutions internationally.

Tag
Critical Engineering

From the Critical Engineering Manifesto:

The Critical Engineer considers Engineering to be the most transformative language of our time, shaping the way we move, communicate and think. It is the work of the Critical Engineer to study and exploit this language, exposing its influence.