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Laboratory provides space and support for interactive art in Spokane, Washington. What is interactive art? We want to support artistic experiences that go beyond either ‘something on a wall’ or ‘something on a stage’. We’re interested in art that creates experiences, where the viewer/user is an integral part in their own experience, where they can touch, manipulate, and, well, interact with the stuff they’re seeing. We want people to feel that art is something that they’re a part of, not just something they look at from a distance and move on. [1]

Laboratory is focused specifically on supporting the development of interactive art. So, we’re interested in artists whose work changes or reacts to audience participation, the changing environment, or other sources of real-time data. Because of this, we tend to have a lot of people who do digital/new media work, but we try hard to be open to other media too. Is your project a wall of paint that people are encouraged to come up and smudge around? A sculpture to be climbed on? Great! Basically, anything that actively involves the viewer, or relies on some kind of data, we’re all for it.[2]

Marpi is a Polish-born, San Francisco-based artist who creates interactive, scalable work across multiple platforms in digital and physical space. In his current practice, he designs and builds vast digital ecosystems that encompass both environments and creatures that are brought into being and shaped by users. His recent work provides different windows into the same universe, where sound, gestures, and other inputs from our world provide the basis for completely new forms of life.[1]

Marpi creates work through Marpi Studios. He works with a small network of creative collaborators - designers, technologists, musicians, and others - to create exhibits, events, and other commissions throughout the world.[1]

References: 1. https://marpi.pl/about/

Benjamin Fry (born 1975) is an American expert in data visualization. He is a principal of Fathom, a design and software consultancy in Boston, Massachusetts. He is also a co-developer of Processing, an open-source programming language and integrated development environment (IDE) built for the electronic arts and visual design communities with the purpose of teaching the basics of computer programming in a visual context. The Processing design environment developed together with Casey Reas won a Golden Nica from the Prix Ars Electronica in 2005.[1]

Codame Art + Tech Codame Logo designed by Vicente Montelongo Codame Art + Tech Codame Art+Tech Festival 2018 Codame Art + Tech Codame Art+Tech Festival 2013
Codame featured artists reel 2014

CODAME shapes the future through inspiring experiences and playful ART+TECH projects. CODAME events, installations, and workshops connect people of all specialties and backgrounds. Join us to continue the visionary celebration, running since 2010! [1]

Leveraging technology for creativity requires cultivation. By valuing questions over answers CODAME creates spaces encouraging exploration and discovery. Artists, entrepreneurs, innovators, amateurs, and leaders are all welcome on our journey. Startups, corporations, non-profits, and collectives alike have participated in CODAME style way-finding! [1]

Gray Area Foundation for the Arts, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization supporting art and technology for social good in San Francisco, California. Gray Area hosts exhibitions and music events, software and electronics classes, a media lab and resident-artist program. Gray Area Foundation for the Arts’ stated purpose is to bring “together the best creative coders, data artists, designers, and makers to create experiments that build social consciousness through digital culture.” [1]

What's The Wrong?

The Wrong is the largest and most comprehensive biennale celebrating digital art today. A global event aiming to nurture digital culture, open to participation, articulating its contents by means of online pavilions and offline embassy locations worldwide.

What’s The Wrong’s mission?

To create, promote and push positive forward-thinking contemporary digital art to a wider audience worldwide through a biennial event that temporarily gathers an extensive selection of digital artworks, embracing the artists, curators and institutions of today’s exciting digital art scene.

Where does The Wrong happen?

The Wrong happens both online and offline. The online part of the biennale happens in pavilions; virtual curated spaces in any online accessible media where selected artworks are exhibited. The offline part of the biennale happens in embassies; institutions, art spaces, galleries and artist run spaces in cities around the world which feature temporary AFK projects, featuring live performances, workshops, artist talks and exhibitions.

Who’s participating in The Wrong?

A extended team of curators appoint themselves to research and feature what they like best of the new digital art scene today. Artists also appoint themselves to join in the many open formats offered. Since its inception, more than 3.000 artists and curators have officially participated either in the online pavilions, or via its 82 embassies around the world, or both. The Wrong is free to participate and to attend, and mostly everything is one click away.

And/Or Gallery is a contemporary gallery in Pasadena with an emphasis on new media exhibitions and editions.

The gallery originally operated in Dallas, Texas from 2006 to 2009 and has been written about in Art Forum and ARTnews, and was featured in the New Museum/MIT Press anthology Mass Effect: Art and the Internet in the Twenty-First Century. [1]

Vector Festival Vector Festival 2018 Vector Festival Vector Festival 2017 Vector Festival Vector Festival 2015

Vector Festival is a participatory and community-oriented initiative dedicated to showcasing digital games and creative media practices. Presenting works across a dynamic range of exhibitions, screenings, performances, lectures, and workshops, Vector acts as a critical bridge between emergent digital platforms and new media art practice. Vector Festival was founded in 2013 as the “Vector Game Art & New Media Festival” by an independent group of artists and curators, Skot Deeming, Clint Enns, Christine Kim, Katie Micak, Diana Poulsen, and Martin Zeilinger. From the start Vector Festival was unique in its inclusion of game based work alongside new media disciplines. In 2015 Vector Festival announced that longtime presenting partner, InterAccess, would be taking over responsibility for the festival as part of its regular programming, with members of the original team, Skot Deeming and Martin Zeilinger, returning as Curators. Historically held in February, the fourth annual Vector Festival was moved to the summer to encourage participatory public events and outdoor interventions. [1]

B4BEL4B B4BEL4B Logo B4BEL4B
B4BEL4B Performance Reel 2018

B4BEL4B is an artist-run gallery and community space for new media and transdisciplinary art with an emphasis on diversity, social engagement and network culture. Our arts program prioritizes women, non-binary, poc, and critically underrepresented groups in technology and media art spaces. We engage communities through a rotating calendar of exhibitions, events, groups, and workshops. [1]

Pronounced "Babe Lab"

References: 1. https://www.b4bel4b.com/

From Ars Electronica:

Art, technology, society. Since 1979, Ars Electronica has sought out interlinkages and congruities, causes and effects. The ideas circulating here are innovative, radical, eccentric in the best sense of that term. They influence our everyday life—our lifestyle, our way of life, every single day.

The Festival as proving ground, the Prix as competition honoring excellence, the Center as a year-‘round setting for presentation & interaction, and the Futurelab and Ars Electronica Solutions as as in-house R&D facility extend their feelers throughout the realms of science and research, art and technology. Ars Electronica’s divisions inspire one another and put futuristic visions to the test in a unique, creative feedback loop. It’s an integrated organism continuously reinventing itself.

From Wikipedia:

Ars Electronica Linz GmbH is an Austrian cultural, educational and scientific institute active in the field of new media art, founded in Linz in 1979. It is based at the Ars Electronica Center, which houses the Museum of the Future, in the city of Linz. Ars Electronica’s activities focus on the interlinkages between art, technology and society. It runs an annual festival, and manages a multidisciplinary media arts R&D facility known as the Futurelab. It also confers the Prix Ars Electronica awards.