foundyou.online /about
Open Filters

Jack Straw Cultural Center is the Northwest's only non-profit multidisciplinary audio arts center. A community-based resource since 1962, we provide a production facility that is unlike any other in the region for local artists who work creatively with sound. Jack Straw focuses on annual artist residencies through our Artist Support Program, our Writers Program, and our Gallery Residency Program; art and technology education for all ages; arts and heritage partnerships; and radio and podcast production. Our full-service recording studio is also available for a range of arts projects.[1]

Mission

Jack Straw Cultural Center exists to foster the communication of arts, ideas, and information to diverse audiences through audio media. We provide creation and production opportunities in audio media, including radio, theater, film, video, music, and literature. Dedicated to the production and presentation of all forms of audio art, Jack Straw 1) produces high quality, innovative audio presentations; 2) commissions independent artists of all disciplines to create sound and audio productions; 3) provides arts and technology education programs for youth and adults; 4) collaborates with arts and heritage organizations to integrate sound and music into their programs; and 5) presents audio productions through events, exhibits, radio, film and the internet.[1]

Jack Straw New Media Gallery

The Jack Straw New Media Gallery opened in 1999 to support artists working with visual and installation art, with an emphasis on sound. The Gallery is one feature of the New Media Gallery Program, and is one of three residency programs at Jack Straw. The New Media Gallery exhibits artists' work through an open call process like the Artist Support Program and Writers Program. As one of a handful of exclusively sound art spaces in the world, it has been attracting applicants nationally and internationally, however Jack Straw has a commitment to local artists.[2]

Gallery residencies include an exhibition of up to three months in the gallery; 20 hours of studio assistance with one of our engineers; access to Jack Straw Cultural Center's audio recording, production, and presentation equipment; two public events - the opening and an artist talk; and an interview podcast. This residency is for exhibiting and performing artists in any medium who would like to incorporate sound into their work.[2]

Laboratory provides space and support for interactive art in Spokane, Washington. What is interactive art? We want to support artistic experiences that go beyond either ‘something on a wall’ or ‘something on a stage’. We’re interested in art that creates experiences, where the viewer/user is an integral part in their own experience, where they can touch, manipulate, and, well, interact with the stuff they’re seeing. We want people to feel that art is something that they’re a part of, not just something they look at from a distance and move on. [1]

Laboratory is focused specifically on supporting the development of interactive art. So, we’re interested in artists whose work changes or reacts to audience participation, the changing environment, or other sources of real-time data. Because of this, we tend to have a lot of people who do digital/new media work, but we try hard to be open to other media too. Is your project a wall of paint that people are encouraged to come up and smudge around? A sculpture to be climbed on? Great! Basically, anything that actively involves the viewer, or relies on some kind of data, we’re all for it.[2]

VIVO Media Arts Centre, a member of British Columbia Museums Association, brings together artists, video and filmmakers, researchers and activists interested in the history of video-making and its evolution towards the art form. VIVO’s educational program extends beyond the boundaries of video distribution and video archiving. The workshops program offers beginner and intermediate level classes on programming, projection mapping, lighting, sound recording by local experts. VIVO accepts research applications to work closely with the Crista Dahl Media Library and Archive thus contributing to the local and international art and research community and encouraging curatorial collaborations.[1]

VIVO’s mandate is to directly support artists and independent community-based producers to develop, exchange, and disseminate their skills in a supportive environment through accessible services and programs. Our vision is a robust, diverse, and vibrant media arts sector: a catalyst for critical and innovative engagement with the material forms and cultural meanings of media and technology. VIVO’s programs offer a broad range of services and opportunities to artists and the public. They include:

  • Access to the material necessities for quality production through affordable equipment rentals, editing 
facilities, software, and production space.
  • A broad range of skill development and education opportunities that encourage the exploration of 
technology and aesthetics within a critical, artistic framework.
  • Public programming: events, exhibitions, residencies, co-productions, and critical forums.
  • International distribution, work exchange, and media art preservation which supports the aspirations and 
livelihood of artists.
  • Western Canada’s largest public reference library and archive of media art, independent video, and 
related publications, documents, audio recordings, and photographs.

[2]

isthisit? is a platform for contemporary art, exhibiting over 700 artists since its creation in May 2016, founded by its current director, artist and curator Bob Bicknell-Knight. Online, it operates as a gallery producing monthly exhibitions showcasing emerging to mid-career artists, hosting a roster of guest curators experimenting with the medium of the internet to interrogate a variety of concepts. The website also hosts monthly residencies, where artists are given a web page to create new work that exists on the internet as a piece of net art. Offline, it has held exhibitions nationally and internationally and is the publisher of isthisit?, a book series released on a triannual basis.[1]

Set up in the mid-1990s, Ljudmila Art and Science Laboratory has been bringing together technology, art, science and civil society ever since. As such, it is not only a place where hackers, researchers and artists meet, but also a platform for reflecting and modifying culture through the lens of politics, as generated by the developments in communications technologies.

Ljudmila's programmes are rather diverse and wide-reaching. It runs the Strictly Analog Festival and the art&hacking meeting PIFcamp. Since 2010, it operates the Culture.si portal and, as of 2013, also the metasearch engine and culture aggregator Kulturnik.si. Since 2011, it acts as a public lead of Creative Commons Slovenia. It organises workshops on the uses of open source software and on making DIY technological hacks; supports the production of new media artworks; has an orchestra; and more. [1]

Established by artists in 1968, SPACE runs 20 artist studio buildings across 7 London boroughs and Colchester, providing affordable creative workspace plus support programmes, such as exhibitions, artists residencies, bursaries and training opportunities, to enable artists to be sustainable. SPACE also delivers Learning projects for schools, young people and communities neighbouring SPACE studio sites, to promote engagement with creativity and the arts.[1]

SPACE Art + Technology provides a test ground and critical exchange platform for artists and thinkers whose work engages with technology. We do this by offering artists residencies as well as regular events and workshops, enabling the public to gain a deeper insight into the challenges and opportunities that technology presents us with today.[2]

Originally conceived as a digital effects and coding atelier and center for youth education, Eyebeam has become a center for the research, development, and curation of new media works of art and open source technology. Eyebeam annually hosts up to 20 residents and co-produces youth educational programs, exhibitions, performances, symposia, workshops, hackathons and other events with these residents as well as with partner organizations. Projects developed at Eyebeam have received awards and recognition including Webby Awards, Guggenheim Fellowships, and the Prix Ars Electronica. [1]

Eyebeam provides both space and support for a community of diverse, impact-driven artists. The residency program brings artists’ work to life and into the world by providing access to advanced tools and resources and launching dynamic public events, assisted by an engaged community of alumni.[2]

SPEKTRUM is a space of convergence for cultural communities and transdisciplinary groups emerging and operating in and off Berlin. The project aims to bring confrontation, open knowledge and a platforms for idealisation, realisation and presentation of technology-based artworks, science-focused events and futuristic utopias based on the principle “do-it-together-with-others”. Above all, we are an open organization promoting participatory processes to co-define and co-design a social and physical playground for curiosity and critical understanding. [1]

The venue is part of a monumental architecture in the heart of Kreuzberg/Neukölln realised by Franz Hoffmann and Bruno Taut, one of the main expressionist architects of the modernist period. The inner space is characterised by a multi-layered approach to heights, with an unusual 5 meter high ceiling for the event room and other sections organised as split-levels. These architectural qualities tell us a story of planes and volumes, offering guests a surprising walk around with secret spots to discover. [1]

Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center is an artist-run, non-profit, media arts center based in Buffalo, New York. Founded in 1985, the organization provides the Western New York region with low-cost media equipment rentals, media arts education for youth and adults, residencies for artists and researchers, and exhibitions, screenings, and other public programming. [1]

Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center has a mission to continue a legacy of innovation in media arts through access, education, and exhibition. We envision a community that uses electronic media and film to celebrate freedom of expression and diversity of voice.

Established in 1985, Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center is the only organization in Western NY to offer education, equipment access, and exhibition programming dedicated to exploring film & digital media arts. Squeaky Wheel’s reputation in the media arts field continues to grow nationally and internationally. We have won awards for Best Workshops of Any Kind (2010); Best Curation (2012); Best Youth Workshops (2013) from regional publication, Buffalo Spree Magazine of Western New York. In 2014, the Arts Services Initiative of Western New York nominated Squeaky Wheel “Cultural Organization of the Year”. [2]