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FILE – Electronic Language International Festival is a non-profit cultural organization that sparks a reflection on the main aspects of the contemporary digital and electronic universe; disseminating the electronic language across Brazil and South America through events and publications since the year 2000.

FILE gathers works of aesthetic expression that capture the main trends and movements of our contemporary culture, which are diversified amongst the main categories of the festival:

Electronic Sonority: Sound Performance, Sound Installations, Sound Art, Genetic Music, Biologic Music, Classical Electronic Music, Pop Electronic Music, Dramatic Radio Broadcasting, Radio Art, Sound Landscape, Sound Robotics, Music Video, Sound Poetry, Sound Robotics, etc.

Interactive Art: installations, performances, internet projects, virtual reality, augmented reality, multitouch tables, digital objects, outdoor projections, phone projects, electronic graffiti, VRML, etc.

Digital Language: digital games, animation, digital theatre, machinima, digital video, digital architecture, digital fashion, digital design, robotics, artificial life, biological art, transgenic art, software art, new interfaces, animes, hypertexts, non-linear scripts, artificial intelligence, programming language, digital poetry, digital dance, etc.

Founded in the year 2000 by Ricardo Barreto and Paula Perissinotto, FILE aims to magnify technological discussions in the cultural scope. Besides the traditional annual event in São Paulo city, the festival expands itself across national and international borders to cities such as Rio de Janeiro, Vitória, Belo Horizonte, Curitiba, Porto Alegre, São Luis and Brasilia.

FILE’s mission is to promote wider access from the general public to technologic languages demonstrating how our contemporary world builds itself on the advances of new and digital media.[1]

V2, Lab for the Unstable Media is an interdisciplinary center for art and media technology in Rotterdam (the Netherlands). V2 presents, produces, archives and publishes research at the interface of art, technology and society. Founded in 1981, V2 offers a platform for artists, designers, scientists, researchers, theorists, and developers of software and hardware from various disciplines to discuss their work and share their findings. In V2's view, art and design play an essential role in the social embedding of technological developments. V2 creates a context in which issues regarding the social impact of technology are explored through critical dialogue, artistic reflection and practice-oriented research.[1]

V2 organizes public programs ranging from exhibitions to workshops, presentations, and community events. These V2events showcase the most exciting developments in the field of art and technology, present V2's research and development, and function as a platform for debate. V2's events offer artists opportunities to present new work to our audience and to exchange ideas with other artists, researchers and technicians. Besides events that take place at V2's venue in Rotterdam, V2 also organizes events at parter institutes and participates in international festivals and symposiums.[2]

V2 has published a number of books on interactive art and related subjects like sociology, media theory, biology, and technological innovation.[3]

The UCLA Department of Design Media Arts (DMA) offers a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to media creation that fosters individual exploration and innovative thinking. Our internationally renowned faculty provides each student with a creative and intellectual foundation for constructing a unique contribution to culture. DMA is committed to educating conscientious creators by emphasizing production within the context of history and theory. The core curriculum is augmented by series of vital lectures, workshops, and other events, and we actively encourage our students to pursue additional interests within the university.[1]

Within the context of the department, design is a process and way of thinking, and media arts foreground experimental media creation. We synthesize practice, history, and theory and hybridize technologies, discourses, and audiences. The results emerge in and on books, galleries, game consoles, installations, films, magazines, performances, public spaces, televisions, and websites. We strive to create socially and culturally relevant objects, experiences, and spaces.[1]

Laboratory provides space and support for interactive art in Spokane, Washington. What is interactive art? We want to support artistic experiences that go beyond either ‘something on a wall’ or ‘something on a stage’. We’re interested in art that creates experiences, where the viewer/user is an integral part in their own experience, where they can touch, manipulate, and, well, interact with the stuff they’re seeing. We want people to feel that art is something that they’re a part of, not just something they look at from a distance and move on. [1]

Laboratory is focused specifically on supporting the development of interactive art. So, we’re interested in artists whose work changes or reacts to audience participation, the changing environment, or other sources of real-time data. Because of this, we tend to have a lot of people who do digital/new media work, but we try hard to be open to other media too. Is your project a wall of paint that people are encouraged to come up and smudge around? A sculpture to be climbed on? Great! Basically, anything that actively involves the viewer, or relies on some kind of data, we’re all for it.[2]

Rhizome champions born-digital art and culture through commissions, exhibitions, digital preservation, and software development. Founded by artist Mark Tribe as a listserve including some of the first artists to work online, Rhizome has played an integral role in the history of contemporary art engaged with digital technologies and the internet. Since 2003, Rhizome has been an affiliate in residence at the New Museum in New York City.[1]

Gray Area Foundation for the Arts, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization supporting art and technology for social good in San Francisco, California. Gray Area hosts exhibitions and music events, software and electronics classes, a media lab and resident-artist program. Gray Area Foundation for the Arts’ stated purpose is to bring “together the best creative coders, data artists, designers, and makers to create experiments that build social consciousness through digital culture.” [1]

New Forms Media Society (NFMS) is a non-profit society and media arts organization founded in 2000 that exists to unite creative communities, push artistic and conceptual boundaries, and explore digital media as an art form. By producing the annual New Forms Festival (NFF) as well as a growing schedule of year-round public presentations, we aim to raise the profile of Canadian artists, media arts, underground and subversive arts movements and practices both in Canada and abroad. NFMS is dedicated to showcasing innovative media works that generate a critical and creative discourse within the public sphere.

By promoting Canadian artists in collaboration with the international arts and technology world, New Forms facilitates multimodal art works and engages in discussion on their role in our cultural environment. Since its inception, an integral element of New Forms is the recognition of independent and groundbreaking artists. The New Forms Festival aims to showcase and increase awareness of these artists and their work within our community and beyond by promoting them within a larger milieu.

New Forms Festival is part of a larger, international, multi-media festival movement, which explores the ever changing and evolving world of art and creates a platform for artistic growth. The Society’s goal is to make new media art, music, film, technology-based installation and performance accessible to a wider audience. [1]

And/Or Gallery is a contemporary gallery in Pasadena with an emphasis on new media exhibitions and editions.

The gallery originally operated in Dallas, Texas from 2006 to 2009 and has been written about in Art Forum and ARTnews, and was featured in the New Museum/MIT Press anthology Mass Effect: Art and the Internet in the Twenty-First Century. [1]

ISEA International is a not for profit organisation constituted in the Netherlands. It is managed by a voluntary board who oversee the activities of ISEA International.

The main activity of ISEA International is the International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA), an annual gathering of the international art, science and technology community. The symposium includes an academic conference, exhibitions, performances and workshops. It is a nomadic event and is held in a different location every year. [1]

Historically the symposia were held as both a biennial and annual event. As of 2009, the symposium has been held annually again. Nowadays, ISEA is one of the most prominent international events on art and technology around the world, bringing together scholarly, artistic, and scientific domains in an interdisciplinary discussion and showcase of creative productions applying new technologies in electronic art, interactivity and digital media. [2]

InterAccess is a Canadian artist-run centre and electronic media production facility in Toronto. Founded in 1982 as Toronto Community Videotex, InterAccess is Ontario's only exhibition space devoted exclusively to technological media arts. The Centre for Contemporary Canadian Art places the founding of InterAccess as a key moment in both the history of Canadian electronic art but also within a timeline of developments in international art, science, technology and culture. [1]

InterAccess’s mission is to expand the cultural significance of art and technology by fostering and supporting the full cycle of art and artistic practice through education, production, and exhibition.

We envision an environment in which:

  • Art that engages technology gains widespread cultural resonance;
  • Critical discourse dedicated to everyday and emerging technologies is catalyzed by artists, curators, and cultural workers;
  • The full life cycle of art and artists is nurtured.

Annually we execute multiple exhibitions, a full curriculum of skill-building and critical theory workshops, and a broad range of discursive events that explore the impact of technology on the social, political and cultural aspects of contemporary life. Our studio space facilitates the circulation of skills and techniques required to produce the work we exhibit in our gallery space. [2]