foundyou.online /about
Open Filters
Robot Music Robot Music
Machine vs Man vs Machine
Dr. Step

Robot music is an ongoing robotic research project between Goto80 and Jacob Remin, centered around automation, creation and loss of control. The project was initiated in 2017 and has been shown in various forms at Illutron (Copenhagen), Algomech Festival (Sheffield), Internetdagarna (Stockholm), 34C3 (Leipzig), among others.[1]

Central to robot music, is robotic arms that play music on a Commodore 64 and other sound machines. The robot remixes pre-made songs, or makes its own. While the robot performs, the artists sit next to it to talk to people about robots being “creative” and “stealing our jobs”. [1]

Babycastles mission is to amplify the diversity of voices in videogame culture by providing artists support to actualize ideas and expose that work to new audiences.[1]

Drawing values from our history in New York’s DIY scene, Babycastles provides an open, accessible and collaborative platform for sharing experimental work across a broad community of artists, musicians, writers, technologists, gamemakers, students, organizers, activists, researchers, chefs, scientists, teachers, animators, zinemakers, filmmakers, moms, modders, curators, speedrunners, builders, journalists, storytellers, comedians, poets, dancers, LARPers, playwrights, Wikipedia editors, botmakers, programmers, performers, algorithms, AI…[1]

The Babycastles art collective began in 2010, roaming between locations throughout New York but usually showcasing events and exhibits at Silent Barn in Brooklyn. After settling into a permanent Chelsea home in 2014, the collective could host musical performances as well as more frequent revolving art shows.[2]

The concerts included all genres—lots of electronic and chiptune acts, but sometimes more obscure, self-proclaimed “nerdy” acts like The Doubleclicks too. It’s not just music either. The venue puts on poetry readings and live theater as well, like the immersive fantasy musical The Universe is a Small Hat. To top it off, Babycastles functions as a coworking space during daytime hours.[2]

Alexei Shulgin, born in 1963 in Moscow. Since mid 80’s e has been working in the fields of photography, media and contemporary arts. In the 90’s he was one of the pioneers of Net Art. His cyberpunk rock band, 386 DX has toured extensively all over the world. Alexei has participated in numerous exhibitions, media art and music festivals in Russia and internationally. He was teaching at Proarte Institute in St. Petersburg in 2000-2001 and performed as a guest teacher at a number of art schools in Europe and the US. Alexei has curated several exhibitions; in 2001-2004 he was a co-organizer of Readme software art festival (Moscow-Helsinki-Aarhus-Dortmund). He is a co-admin of Runme.org software art repository on the Internet. In 2004 he has co-founded Electroboutique gallery in Moscow. At present, he teaches at Rodchenko school of Photography and Media Art in Moscow. Alexei Shulgin lives and works in Moscow.[1]

Particularly involved with software art and internet art, he is a part of the readme culture and uses code as a form of art. In 1997, he released his first interactive work, Form Art, in which only minimum factors are programmed in the form of HTML. Shulgin describes this page as a "formalistic" aesthetic art site - a play on words taking into account the clean composition as well as the tools of its creation. Navigating this site requires aimless click-throughs of blank boxes and links, which lead the viewer through 19 pages of "form art" animations. Behavioral expectations are subverted by frequently overriding default functionality of basic form elements such as radio buttons and list boxes.[2]

Many links on his site are now 404, selected online works:

New Forms Media Society (NFMS) is a non-profit society and media arts organization founded in 2000 that exists to unite creative communities, push artistic and conceptual boundaries, and explore digital media as an art form. By producing the annual New Forms Festival (NFF) as well as a growing schedule of year-round public presentations, we aim to raise the profile of Canadian artists, media arts, underground and subversive arts movements and practices both in Canada and abroad. NFMS is dedicated to showcasing innovative media works that generate a critical and creative discourse within the public sphere.

By promoting Canadian artists in collaboration with the international arts and technology world, New Forms facilitates multimodal art works and engages in discussion on their role in our cultural environment. Since its inception, an integral element of New Forms is the recognition of independent and groundbreaking artists. The New Forms Festival aims to showcase and increase awareness of these artists and their work within our community and beyond by promoting them within a larger milieu.

New Forms Festival is part of a larger, international, multi-media festival movement, which explores the ever changing and evolving world of art and creates a platform for artistic growth. The Society’s goal is to make new media art, music, film, technology-based installation and performance accessible to a wider audience. [1]

Sonic Acts was founded in 1994. Over the years, it has established itself as a thematic festival with a strong focus on contemporary and historical developments at the intersections of art, technology, music and science. Each festival edition explores the chosen theme by means of an international conference, a wide range of concerts and performances, exhibitions and screenings, and embraces a broad spectrum of fields, practices and disciplines.

Sonic Acts has developed into an organisation for the research, development and production of works at the intersection of art, science and theory. It also commissions and co-produces new works, often in collaboration with international festivals, arts organisations, funders and other partners. Recent projects include the three-year art, research & commissioning project Dark Ecology, predominantly taking place in the Arctic region, and its globally touring programme Vertical Cinema. [1]