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foundyou.online is a directory for new media art. You can browse the index of organizations, and events/festivals. You can also search by location, and sort by tag or decade.

Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo The Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo offers permanent and temporary exhibitions | © Masayuki Yamashita / Alamy Stock Photo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo

With a collection of over 5,500 works of art and 270,000 book materials, the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo today conducts various projects to grasp the current state of art by actively addressing the latest creative endeavors, both at home and abroad, within a variety of fields. It attempts to meet the needs of wide range of visitors, its various departments collaborating in such areas as the collection of works/reference materials, the presentation of permanent/ temporary exhibitions, education and the maintenance of a comprehensive art library, working in the pursuit and promotion of art that is appropriate to the diversified values of the current age. [1]

The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment was founded in 2011 as a non-profit dedicated to the preservation of our digital heritage in playable form, and to inspire the next generation of game developers. The MADE is a 501c3 non-profit. [1]

Despite having made a remarkable impact upon our modern culture, video games have largely been left out of the mainstream information preservation discussion. Aside from occasionally popping into the public consciousness, the day-to-day work of preserving our digital heritage in a form that can still be played is largely performed by loosely knit groupings of communities that operate somewhat outside the legal bounds of modern copyright laws. [1]

Thus, the MADE seeks to legitimize the preservation of video games as both a historic and artistic medium within the context of our time. Hence, visitors to the MADE can pay a single admission fee and then subsequently play any of our collection of over 12,000 games across 40 systems for as long as they may like. [1]

Rather than an arcade, the MADE is a bit more like a digital library, where research can be performed, history can be learned, and of course, flights of fancy and adventure can take place. [1]

Unsound focuses on a broad swath of contemporary music — emerging, experimental, and leftfield — whose sweep doesn't follow typical genre constraints. Influential, it has developed a reputation for identifying innovative scenes and radical sounds.[1]

Founded in 2003, Unsound wasn’t always the festival it is now. The very first edition ended with artists thrown out of a club for playing music that was too weird for regular patrons. Now, with the main festival still happening every year at a number of venues across Kraków, regular events also take place in New York, Adelaide, Toronto, and London. Between 2016 and 2018, Unsound also produced eleven festivals in Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Caucasus, part of a long history of working with curators and artists in the post-Soviet region.[1]

As well as spotlighting emerging artists, Unsound also commissions new shows and encourages transborder collaborations, adapts and reimagines abandoned spaces for concerts and club nights, manages cutting-edge artists, and is known for its sound-inspired Ephemera perfume project. Unsound is also a platform, commissioning and releasing new music and books.[1]

Laboratory provides space and support for interactive art in Spokane, Washington. What is interactive art? We want to support artistic experiences that go beyond either ‘something on a wall’ or ‘something on a stage’. We’re interested in art that creates experiences, where the viewer/user is an integral part in their own experience, where they can touch, manipulate, and, well, interact with the stuff they’re seeing. We want people to feel that art is something that they’re a part of, not just something they look at from a distance and move on. [1]

Laboratory is focused specifically on supporting the development of interactive art. So, we’re interested in artists whose work changes or reacts to audience participation, the changing environment, or other sources of real-time data. Because of this, we tend to have a lot of people who do digital/new media work, but we try hard to be open to other media too. Is your project a wall of paint that people are encouraged to come up and smudge around? A sculpture to be climbed on? Great! Basically, anything that actively involves the viewer, or relies on some kind of data, we’re all for it. [2]

Founded in 1971, Trinity Square Video is one of Canada’s first artist-run centres and its oldest media arts centre. We are a not-for-profit, charitable organization.[1]

For 50 years, Trinity Square has been a champion of media arts practices. Our activities are guided by a goal to increase our members’ and audiences’ understanding and imagination of what media arts practices can be. Trinity Square strives to create supportive environments, encouraging artistic and curatorial experimentation that challenge medium specificity through education, production and presentation supports.[1]

As video-based practices have become increasingly present across disciplines, Trinity Square engages artists and curators in critical investigations into the changing conditions of perception, materiality and the virtual. We consider all of our artistic activities and structures through a process of critical self-reflection, continuously evaluating the ethical positioning of our programming, jury structures, inter-organizational relationships, et cetera. In addition to holding aesthetic worth in its own right, our artistic programming extends our education and production activities in order to generate new knowledges.[1]

Trinity Square’s programming is guided by three priorities: 1) promoting an expanded definition of media arts; 2) promoting the meaningful engagement of diverse voices in all levels of our operations; and 3) supporting and nurturing the production of new works by artists and curators. Our membership represents the diversity of the city and honours the original mandate of the organization—seeking to reduce barriers to access related to race, gender, sexual orientation, and socio- economic and physical ability. [1]

Over 20+ years, CTM has been highlighting new strains of pop and fringe cultures that venture through the weird, the challenging, the cathartic, the esoteric, the contagious, and the ecstatic – simultaneously exploring sonic histories, contexts, and political and technological entanglements. Though international in its approach, CTM remains deeply rooted in and committed to Berlin’s DIY and club scenes, from which it emerged in 1999. [1]

Listening and dancing within the gaps between musics, communities, and scenes, CTM defies easy categorisation and tests the current possibilities and limits of sound and music. Programming supports a multitude of voices, backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives – CTM is for all forms of music as long as they dare to experiment, question, and demonstrate conviction. Our work reaches out to all corners of the globe to explore and explode wildly different, experimental, mutating global scenes. [1]

CTM is an independent, non-profit initiative built, from the very start, on constant collaboration. We work closely with artists, guest curators, and researchers to support them in realising new projects and to produce and transmit new knowledge across performances, exhibitions, talks and artistic labs, writing, and more. Through a multi-perspective approach, we aim to respond to the diversity of an increasingly polycentric, polychromatic, and hybrid (music) world, always with empathy, openness, and a desire to counter global asymmetries. [1]

Because of CTM’s mutually collaborative nature, activities highlight a large and ever-expanding range of practices in and around sound. Through yearly themes, the festival experiments with formats, locations, technologies, and ways of listening, creating multiple entry points from which to engage with sound and their contexts. [1]

Music is not a parallel world, but rather a seismograph of our current societies, a powerful force with which to cope with uncertainty and change, and a medium through which to imagine different futures. [1]

From Ars Electronica:

Art, technology, society. Since 1979, Ars Electronica has sought out interlinkages and congruities, causes and effects. The ideas circulating here are innovative, radical, eccentric in the best sense of that term. They influence our everyday life—our lifestyle, our way of life, every single day.

The Festival as proving ground, the Prix as competition honoring excellence, the Center as a year-‘round setting for presentation & interaction, and the Futurelab and Ars Electronica Solutions as as in-house R&D facility extend their feelers throughout the realms of science and research, art and technology. Ars Electronica’s divisions inspire one another and put futuristic visions to the test in a unique, creative feedback loop. It’s an integrated organism continuously reinventing itself.

From Wikipedia:

Ars Electronica Linz GmbH is an Austrian cultural, educational and scientific institute active in the field of new media art, founded in Linz in 1979. It is based at the Ars Electronica Center, which houses the Museum of the Future, in the city of Linz. Ars Electronica’s activities focus on the interlinkages between art, technology and society. It runs an annual festival, and manages a multidisciplinary media arts R&D facility known as the Futurelab. It also confers the Prix Ars Electronica awards.

Since 2008, CreativeApplications.Net (CAN) has been at the forefront of innovation—facilitating and driving the conversations about technology, society and critical making. It has played an instrumental role in uncovering and contextualising noteworthy work, featured on the festival and gallery circuit or developed as academic research. With over 3,500 catalogued projects, experiments, texts and reviews, CAN plays an instrumental role in shaping the innovative creative practices of tomorrow.[1]

Neural is a printed magazine established in 1993 dealing with new media art, electronic music and hacktivism. It was founded by Alessandro Ludovico and Minus Habens Records label owner Ivan Iusco in Bari (Italy). In its first issue (distributed in November 1993) there was the only translation in Italian of the William Gibson’s Agrippa (a book of the dead) book.[1]

The first topics covered were: cyberpunk (both as a literally and political movement), electronic music, networks and BBS, virtual reality, media, science fiction and UFO. The magazine’s mission was to be a magazine of ideas, becoming a node in a larger network of digital culture publishers. The magazine was also committed to give its topics a proper visual frame: focusing on graphic design and how it could have expressed the electronic culture in a sort of printed ‘interface’, exploiting at the same time the “sensorial” possibilities of the printed page. So, for example the page numbering was strictly in binary numbers for 3 years, then decimal figures were added aside. There was a department with stereogram pictures and the centerfold hosted a few optical art artworks. The graphic design included a fixed space in every article for contact and links, being inspired by the Whole Earth Catalog experiments.[1]

References: 1. http://neural.it/about/

A MAZE. / Berlin is an international festival focusing on arthouse games and playful media. For the day experience A MAZE. / Berlin invites globally spread and diverse experimental game and VR creators, digital artists, musicians and other playful creatives from around different countries who share in an inspiring 5-day program of talks and workshops, idea market places and knowledge bazaar the art of video games making. [1]