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foundyou.online is a directory for new media art. You can browse artists, artworks, organizations, and events. You can also search by location, and sort by tag or decade.

Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD-Rom, DVD-Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.[1]

Emphasizing multimedia artworks that reflect digital extensions of twentieth-century developments in cinema, video, installation, photography, and sound, holdings include extensive special collections in American and Chinese new media arts, significant online and offline holdings in internet art, and the majority of works in the international exhibition, Contact Zones: The Art of CD-Rom.[1]

The curatorial vision emphasizes digital interfaces and artistic experimentation by international, independent artists. Designed as an experimental center of research and creativity, the Goldsen Archive includes materials by individual artists and collaborates on conceptual experimentation and archival strategies with international curatorial and fellowship projects.[2]

Société is an exhibition platform founded in 2015 and situated the former electricity factory “Société Bruxelloise d’Électricité” built in the 1930s in the Tour and Taxi neighborhood. It is initiated, directed and curated by the artist couple Manuel Abendroth and Els Vermang, of the artis trio LAb[au].[1]

As an artist run space, Société pursuits a non-commercial activity, promoting a dialogue between artists on current artistic issues. Through two thematic exhibitions a year, they explore the field of contemporary artistic research while taking into account new forms of artistic expression and new technologies which support them. Their exhibitions contextualize these reflections in an artistic continuity, connecting different generations of artists while also promoting the Belgian scene.[1]

Jack Straw Cultural Center is the Northwest's only non-profit multidisciplinary audio arts center. A community-based resource since 1962, we provide a production facility that is unlike any other in the region for local artists who work creatively with sound. Jack Straw focuses on annual artist residencies through our Artist Support Program, our Writers Program, and our Gallery Residency Program; art and technology education for all ages; arts and heritage partnerships; and radio and podcast production. Our full-service recording studio is also available for a range of arts projects.[1]

Mission

Jack Straw Cultural Center exists to foster the communication of arts, ideas, and information to diverse audiences through audio media. We provide creation and production opportunities in audio media, including radio, theater, film, video, music, and literature. Dedicated to the production and presentation of all forms of audio art, Jack Straw 1) produces high quality, innovative audio presentations; 2) commissions independent artists of all disciplines to create sound and audio productions; 3) provides arts and technology education programs for youth and adults; 4) collaborates with arts and heritage organizations to integrate sound and music into their programs; and 5) presents audio productions through events, exhibits, radio, film and the internet.[1]

Jack Straw New Media Gallery

The Jack Straw New Media Gallery opened in 1999 to support artists working with visual and installation art, with an emphasis on sound. The Gallery is one feature of the New Media Gallery Program, and is one of three residency programs at Jack Straw. The New Media Gallery exhibits artists' work through an open call process like the Artist Support Program and Writers Program. As one of a handful of exclusively sound art spaces in the world, it has been attracting applicants nationally and internationally, however Jack Straw has a commitment to local artists.[2]

Gallery residencies include an exhibition of up to three months in the gallery; 20 hours of studio assistance with one of our engineers; access to Jack Straw Cultural Center's audio recording, production, and presentation equipment; two public events - the opening and an artist talk; and an interview podcast. This residency is for exhibiting and performing artists in any medium who would like to incorporate sound into their work.[2]

The Palais de Tokyo (Palace of Tokyo) is a building dedicated to modern and contemporary art, located at 13 avenue du Président-Wilson, near the Trocadéro, in the 16th arrondissement of Paris. The eastern wing of the building belongs to the City of Paris, and hosts the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris). The western wing belongs to the French state and since 2002 has hosted the Palais de Tokyo / Site de création contemporaine, the largest museum in France dedicated to temporary exhibitions of contemporary art. [1]

Dedicated to both emerging and established artists from France and around the world, the Palais de Tokyo’s programming is punctuated by thematic and monographic exhibitions, large-scale artistic interventions, and carte blanche invitations to artists who take over the entirety of the space. Each season is accompanied by completely new transformations within the Palais, as artists welcome visitors into the heart of their practice, renewing their relationship to art. [2]

Open to all disciplines and with the ambition to explore all realms of artistic expression – from performance to fashion to arts and crafts and more – Palais de Tokyo has also developed a cultural program at the intersection of movement, sound, and language, and in 2015 launched the annual “DO DISTURB” festival. [2]

Synchronicity is an art gallery but in practice it is so much more. It is located in East Hollywood in Los Angeles, CA. Its doors are open to a community of contemporary thinkers whose goal is to make thoughtful and intelligent work never limiting themselves to a specific medium. We host exhibitions, screenings, performances, and parties. Staying active within the community and also bringing others into it remains the most important goal of the space.[1]

The SPEED SHOW exhibition series was conceived by the artist Aram Bartholl in June 2010. The basic idea of this exhibition format is to create a gallery like opening situation for browser based internet art in a public cyber-cafe or internet-shop for one night. The exhibition format is free and can be applied by anyone at any place. (See how to instructions)[1]

The SPEED SHOW exhibition format:

Hit an Internet-cafe, rent all computers they have and run a show on them for one night. All art works of the participating artists need to be online (not necessarily public) and are shown in a typical browser with standard plug-ins. Performance and live pieces may also use pre-installed communication programs (instant messaging, VOIP, video chat, etc). Custom software (except browser add-ons) or offline files are not permitted. Any creative physical modification to the Internet cafe itself is not allowed. The show is public and takes place during normal opening hours of the Internet cafe/shop. All visitors are welcome to join the opening, enjoy the art (and to check their email).[1]

The UCLA Department of Design Media Arts (DMA) offers a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to media creation that fosters individual exploration and innovative thinking. Our internationally renowned faculty provides each student with a creative and intellectual foundation for constructing a unique contribution to culture. DMA is committed to educating conscientious creators by emphasizing production within the context of history and theory. The core curriculum is augmented by series of vital lectures, workshops, and other events, and we actively encourage our students to pursue additional interests within the university.[1]

Within the context of the department, design is a process and way of thinking, and media arts foreground experimental media creation. We synthesize practice, history, and theory and hybridize technologies, discourses, and audiences. The results emerge in and on books, galleries, game consoles, installations, films, magazines, performances, public spaces, televisions, and websites. We strive to create socially and culturally relevant objects, experiences, and spaces.[1]

No Fun is the video of an online performance in which we simulated a suicide and filmed viewers’ reactions. It is staged on a popular website that pairs random people from around the world for webcam-based conversations. Thousands watched him hanging from the ceiling, swinging slowly for hours, without being able to know whether it was reality or fiction. They unwittingly became the subject of the work. [1]

Weirdcore 2016 looped "The Glass Eyes" by Radiohead made/shoot by Weirdcore Weirdcore Aphex Twin – Collapse Print, 2018
Interpreting Aphex Twin: The visual world of Collapse
2017 "Phase Magenta" + "Inulin" by Overmono video directed, shot & edited by Weirdcore & Overmono on XL records
Games - 'Shadows In Bloom', Directed by Weirdcore
Weirdcore Artist Talk
APHEX TWIN – COLLAPSE VIDEO 2018 video by Weirdcore

London based WEIRDCORE is half English, half French and results in a director and collaborator who is one hundred percent out there. [1]

Weirdcore’s work is the result of years of experimental design and animation work that pushes the boundaries of consciousness and visual interpretation. Adopting a method used more often by artists and music producers rather than by visual directors, Weirdcore helps both advise and visualise others initial ideas, facilitating their progress through until the finished form, whilst also creating his own stunning individual projects. With a unique blend of formats, colours, designs and mediums, Weirdcore has collaborated with some of the most exciting modern artists and directors such as Aphex Twin, M.I.A, Nabil, Hype Williams, Charlie XCX, Skrillex, Sophie Muller, Diane Martel and Miley Cyrus, in order to create innovative and groundbreaking videos, visuals, interactive installations and other projects. Weirdcore has also lent his emotive expertise to larger collectives, organisations and labels such as Warp, XL, Sony, Ninja Tunes and Domino, whilst keeping a dynamic and fluid focus across a range of other diverse industry’s such as Fashion, Theatre and Opera. [1]

Most recently, Weirdcore created a stunning CG world for Tame Impala’s “Cause I’m a Man” and is currently working alongside M.I.A.’s on her new album visuals. Drawing on elements that are highly structured, Weirdcore smashes conventional directorial ideas of where an image ends, paralleling universes seamlessly between 2D & 3D lending a one-of-a-kind twist to the graphic approach for videos, commercials, live visuals and fashion films. Weirdcore is driven by technology as an experimental exercise exploring artistic bipolarity with rough, raw style, hip yet always organic and with a definitive edge. [1]

Though he has achieved a level of success in his field, it's probably comforting to the musicians he works with that he views himself as a support unit to their own ideas. "I realize that when I speak to real artists like Florian Hecker or MIA, if I ask them questions as to why they do certain things, their answers are so deep or subjective, where I don't think like that at all," he explains. "I'm much more logical and straightforward, and all of my graphics are purely about aesthetics. No story or meaning to them, just purely about bold impact and causing a reaction. As far as I'm concerned, despite being very passionate about it all, I'm far too logical and driven by briefs and deadlines to be considered an artist." [2]

Laboratory provides space and support for interactive art in Spokane, Washington. What is interactive art? We want to support artistic experiences that go beyond either ‘something on a wall’ or ‘something on a stage’. We’re interested in art that creates experiences, where the viewer/user is an integral part in their own experience, where they can touch, manipulate, and, well, interact with the stuff they’re seeing. We want people to feel that art is something that they’re a part of, not just something they look at from a distance and move on. [1]

Laboratory is focused specifically on supporting the development of interactive art. So, we’re interested in artists whose work changes or reacts to audience participation, the changing environment, or other sources of real-time data. Because of this, we tend to have a lot of people who do digital/new media work, but we try hard to be open to other media too. Is your project a wall of paint that people are encouraged to come up and smudge around? A sculpture to be climbed on? Great! Basically, anything that actively involves the viewer, or relies on some kind of data, we’re all for it.[2]