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Open Filters

Aram Bartholl’s work creates an interplay between internet, culture and reality. How do our taken-for-granted communication channels influence us? Bartholl asks not just what humans are doing with media, but what media is doing with humans. Tensions between public and private, online and offline, techno-lust and everyday life are at the core of his work and his public interventions and installations, often entailing surprisingly physical manifestations of the digital world, challenge our concepts of reality and incorporeality. Bartholl has exhibited at MoMA Museum of Modern Art NY, Skulptur Projekte Münster, Palais de Tokyo, Hamburger Bahnhof and the Thailand Biennale among other as well as conducting countless workshops, talks and performances internationally. Bartholl lives and works in Berlin.[1]

From julianoliver.com:

Julian Oliver is a New Zealander, Critical Engineer and artist based in Berlin. His work and lectures have been presented at many museums, galleries, international electronic-art events and conferences, including the Tate Modern, Transmediale, the Chaos Computer Congress, Ars Electronica, FILE and the Japan Media Arts Festival. Julian has received several awards, most notably the distinguished Golden Nica at Prix Ars Electronica 2011 for the project Newstweek (with Daniil Vasiliev). He is the co-author of the Critical Engineering Manifesto and co-founder of Crypto Party in Berlin, who’s shared studio Weise7 hosted the first three crypto-parties worldwide. He is also the co-founder of BLACKLIST, a screening and panel series focused on the primary existential threats of our time.

SPEKTRUM is a space of convergence for cultural communities and transdisciplinary groups emerging and operating in and off Berlin. The project aims to bring confrontation, open knowledge and a platforms for idealisation, realisation and presentation of technology-based artworks, science-focused events and futuristic utopias based on the principle “do-it-together-with-others”. Above all, we are an open organization promoting participatory processes to co-define and co-design a social and physical playground for curiosity and critical understanding. [1]

The venue is part of a monumental architecture in the heart of Kreuzberg/Neukölln realised by Franz Hoffmann and Bruno Taut, one of the main expressionist architects of the modernist period. The inner space is characterised by a multi-layered approach to heights, with an unusual 5 meter high ceiling for the event room and other sections organised as split-levels. These architectural qualities tell us a story of planes and volumes, offering guests a surprising walk around with secret spots to discover. [1]

Radical Networks is a conference that celebrates the free and open Internet, with hands-on workshops, speakers, and a gallery exhibiting artworks centered around radio and networking technology. It fosters critical discussion on contemporary issues that include surveillance, the spread of misinformation, ownership of personal data, and the increasing opacity of “The Cloud”.

Radical Networks is also an arts festival that considers networking technology as an artistic medium, featuring works that run the gamut from ethical hacks to creative experiments to live performances. [1]

From Ars Electronica:

Art, technology, society. Since 1979, Ars Electronica has sought out interlinkages and congruities, causes and effects. The ideas circulating here are innovative, radical, eccentric in the best sense of that term. They influence our everyday life—our lifestyle, our way of life, every single day.

The Festival as proving ground, the Prix as competition honoring excellence, the Center as a year-‘round setting for presentation & interaction, and the Futurelab and Ars Electronica Solutions as as in-house R&D facility extend their feelers throughout the realms of science and research, art and technology. Ars Electronica’s divisions inspire one another and put futuristic visions to the test in a unique, creative feedback loop. It’s an integrated organism continuously reinventing itself.

From Wikipedia:

Ars Electronica Linz GmbH is an Austrian cultural, educational and scientific institute active in the field of new media art, founded in Linz in 1979. It is based at the Ars Electronica Center, which houses the Museum of the Future, in the city of Linz. Ars Electronica’s activities focus on the interlinkages between art, technology and society. It runs an annual festival, and manages a multidisciplinary media arts R&D facility known as the Futurelab. It also confers the Prix Ars Electronica awards.

Transmediale Transmediale 2019 Logo

transmediale is a yearly Berlin-based festival and cultural organization that facilitates critical reflection on and interventions into processes of cultural transformation from a post-digital perspective. In the course of its more than 30 year history, the transmediale/festival has turned into an essential event in the calendar of media art professionals, artists, activists, and students from all over the world. [1]

Annually it presents an extensive range of exhibitions, conferences, screenings, performances, and publications to more than 25,000 visitors. In bringing together artists, researchers, activists, and thinkers, transmediale offers new perspectives and approaches on how the digital and a general technological condition has become a factor of influence in practically all spheres of life. The broad cultural appeal of the festival is recognized by the German federal government who supports the transmediale through its program for beacons of contemporary culture. [1]

Since 2011, transmediale’s all-year activities include cooperation projects, networking activities, the Vilém Flusser Residency for Artistic Research, and special events. These activities provide a sustainable structure of feedback, research, and reflection that interacts with the annual festival. As part of this endeavor, the transmediale journal launched in 2016, providing a platform for ongoing reflections, reactions, and discussions in many different forms. [1]