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Open Filters

Babycastles mission is to amplify the diversity of voices in videogame culture by providing artists support to actualize ideas and expose that work to new audiences.[1]

Drawing values from our history in New York’s DIY scene, Babycastles provides an open, accessible and collaborative platform for sharing experimental work across a broad community of artists, musicians, writers, technologists, gamemakers, students, organizers, activists, researchers, chefs, scientists, teachers, animators, zinemakers, filmmakers, moms, modders, curators, speedrunners, builders, journalists, storytellers, comedians, poets, dancers, LARPers, playwrights, Wikipedia editors, botmakers, programmers, performers, algorithms, AI…[1]

The Babycastles art collective began in 2010, roaming between locations throughout New York but usually showcasing events and exhibits at Silent Barn in Brooklyn. After settling into a permanent Chelsea home in 2014, the collective could host musical performances as well as more frequent revolving art shows.[2]

The concerts included all genres—lots of electronic and chiptune acts, but sometimes more obscure, self-proclaimed “nerdy” acts like The Doubleclicks too. It’s not just music either. The venue puts on poetry readings and live theater as well, like the immersive fantasy musical The Universe is a Small Hat. To top it off, Babycastles functions as a coworking space during daytime hours.[2]

Established by artists in 1968, SPACE runs 20 artist studio buildings across 7 London boroughs and Colchester, providing affordable creative workspace plus support programmes, such as exhibitions, artists residencies, bursaries and training opportunities, to enable artists to be sustainable. SPACE also delivers Learning projects for schools, young people and communities neighbouring SPACE studio sites, to promote engagement with creativity and the arts.[1]

SPACE Art + Technology provides a test ground and critical exchange platform for artists and thinkers whose work engages with technology. We do this by offering artists residencies as well as regular events and workshops, enabling the public to gain a deeper insight into the challenges and opportunities that technology presents us with today.[2]

Established in 2004, Secret Project Robot is a 501c3 not for profit artist run art space with a gallery which hosts art installations, music, performance art, gatherings, happenings, craft nights, parties, dj's and much more. In 2017, the founders and co-conspirators created a new bar and hangout within Secret Project Robot to help fund the space and employee artists. [1]

VISION

Secret Project Robot aims to integrate and overlap all the arts into a fluid, artful, casual, friendly environment, to create a perpetual happening and a kind of house party that is run and supported by the people participating.

Secret Project Robot seeks to build a strong artist, musician, and intellectual community as a tangible way to mitigate the feelings of alienation brought on by tyranny and a failing world order created by the neo-liberal capitalist system.

Secret Project Robot desires to be a fully self sustaining artist run art space. Using sales from the Bar we are aiming to create a new way to run and communally finance an art space and art. [1]

Originally conceived as a digital effects and coding atelier and center for youth education, Eyebeam has become a center for the research, development, and curation of new media works of art and open source technology. Eyebeam annually hosts up to 20 residents and co-produces youth educational programs, exhibitions, performances, symposia, workshops, hackathons and other events with these residents as well as with partner organizations. Projects developed at Eyebeam have received awards and recognition including Webby Awards, Guggenheim Fellowships, and the Prix Ars Electronica. [1]

Eyebeam provides both space and support for a community of diverse, impact-driven artists. The residency program brings artists’ work to life and into the world by providing access to advanced tools and resources and launching dynamic public events, assisted by an engaged community of alumni.[2]

Codame Art + Tech Codame Logo designed by Vicente Montelongo Codame Art + Tech Codame Art+Tech Festival 2018 Codame Art + Tech Codame Art+Tech Festival 2013
Codame featured artists reel 2014

CODAME shapes the future through inspiring experiences and playful ART+TECH projects. CODAME events, installations, and workshops connect people of all specialties and backgrounds. Join us to continue the visionary celebration, running since 2010! [1]

Leveraging technology for creativity requires cultivation. By valuing questions over answers CODAME creates spaces encouraging exploration and discovery. Artists, entrepreneurs, innovators, amateurs, and leaders are all welcome on our journey. Startups, corporations, non-profits, and collectives alike have participated in CODAME style way-finding! [1]

Rhizome champions born-digital art and culture through commissions, exhibitions, digital preservation, and software development. Founded by artist Mark Tribe as a listserve including some of the first artists to work online, Rhizome has played an integral role in the history of contemporary art engaged with digital technologies and the internet. Since 2003, Rhizome has been an affiliate in residence at the New Museum in New York City.[1]

Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center is an artist-run, non-profit, media arts center based in Buffalo, New York. Founded in 1985, the organization provides the Western New York region with low-cost media equipment rentals, media arts education for youth and adults, residencies for artists and researchers, and exhibitions, screenings, and other public programming. [1]

Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center has a mission to continue a legacy of innovation in media arts through access, education, and exhibition. We envision a community that uses electronic media and film to celebrate freedom of expression and diversity of voice.

Established in 1985, Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center is the only organization in Western NY to offer education, equipment access, and exhibition programming dedicated to exploring film & digital media arts. Squeaky Wheel’s reputation in the media arts field continues to grow nationally and internationally. We have won awards for Best Workshops of Any Kind (2010); Best Curation (2012); Best Youth Workshops (2013) from regional publication, Buffalo Spree Magazine of Western New York. In 2014, the Arts Services Initiative of Western New York nominated Squeaky Wheel “Cultural Organization of the Year”. [2]

Gray Area Foundation for the Arts, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization supporting art and technology for social good in San Francisco, California. Gray Area hosts exhibitions and music events, software and electronics classes, a media lab and resident-artist program. Gray Area Foundation for the Arts’ stated purpose is to bring “together the best creative coders, data artists, designers, and makers to create experiments that build social consciousness through digital culture.” [1]

InterAccess is a Canadian artist-run centre and electronic media production facility in Toronto. Founded in 1982 as Toronto Community Videotex, InterAccess is Ontario's only exhibition space devoted exclusively to technological media arts. The Centre for Contemporary Canadian Art places the founding of InterAccess as a key moment in both the history of Canadian electronic art but also within a timeline of developments in international art, science, technology and culture. [1]

InterAccess’s mission is to expand the cultural significance of art and technology by fostering and supporting the full cycle of art and artistic practice through education, production, and exhibition.

We envision an environment in which:

  • Art that engages technology gains widespread cultural resonance;
  • Critical discourse dedicated to everyday and emerging technologies is catalyzed by artists, curators, and cultural workers;
  • The full life cycle of art and artists is nurtured.

Annually we execute multiple exhibitions, a full curriculum of skill-building and critical theory workshops, and a broad range of discursive events that explore the impact of technology on the social, political and cultural aspects of contemporary life. Our studio space facilitates the circulation of skills and techniques required to produce the work we exhibit in our gallery space. [2]

The Lab The Lab's logo, designed by Colpa Press The Lab The Lab (San Francisco)

From The Lab:

The Lab gives funding, time, and space to traditionally underrepresented artists and art forms. The organization intentionally focuses on supporting and amplifying the work of experimental artists who identify as African and African-American; Latinx; Asian and Asian-American; Arab and Arab-American; Indigenous American; Pacific Islander; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer; differently-abled; and female. We seek to reach visionary artists whose economic and cultural realities have been ignored for too long, to the impoverishment of us all. The Lab is, above all, a catalyst for artistic experimentation. As a site of ongoing iteration and indeterminacy, it seeks to transform alongside artistic practices in order to engage meaningfully with diverse communities in San Francisco's Mission District and beyond.

We believe it is important to constantly question our own organizational model and to deeply engage with new artistic practices and modes of thinking around the arts. The Lab embodies the desires of creative, critical, and compassionate individuals. We want audiences to be inspired by the way we work, not just what we produce.

To that end, The Lab is W.A.G.E. Certified. W.A.G.E. Certification is a program initiated and operated by working artists that publicly recognizes nonprofit arts organizations demonstrating a commitment to voluntarily paying artist fees that meet a minimum standard.