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foundyou.online is a directory for new media art. You can browse artists, artworks, organizations, and events. You can also search by location, and sort by tag or decade.

Founded in 2001, bitforms gallery represents established, mid-career, and emerging artists critically engaged with new technologies. Spanning the rich history of media art through its current developments, the gallery’s program offers an incisive perspective on the fields of digital, internet, time-based, and new media art forms. [1]

Supporting and advocating for the collection of ephemeral, time-based, and digital art works since its founding, bitforms gallery artists are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; Center for Art and Media (ZKM), Karlsruhe; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul, among other institutions internationally.

Tag
Critical Engineering

From the Critical Engineering Manifesto:

The Critical Engineer considers Engineering to be the most transformative language of our time, shaping the way we move, communicate and think. It is the work of the Critical Engineer to study and exploit this language, exposing its influence.

Claudia Hart (born 1955 in New York, NY) is an artist and associate professor in the Department of Film, Video, New Media, Animation at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. She is represented by bitforms gallery, New York. Hart has been active as an artist, curator and critic since 1988. She creates virtual representations that take the form of 3D imagery integrated into photography, animated loops and multi-channel animation installations. [1]

Hart's work applies a feminist perspective to a discussion of digital technology and a critique of the media. Much of her work attempts to introduce women into a male-dominated technological culture and condemn the violent impulses of a masculine digital production environment. In her artist statement, Hart says, "By creating virtual images that are sensual but not pornographic within mechanized, clockwork depictions of the natural, I try to subvert earlier dichotomies of woman and nature pitted against a civilized, "scientific" and masculine world of technology. In my own way, I am staging a romantic rebellion against technocratic and bureaucratic culture." [1]

Tag
Augmented Reality

Augmented reality is an emerging technology that permits users to see media embedded in physical objects or linked to specific locations in the real world. It is currently available only through custom applications, but will soon be a common feature in every smart device. Just like turning on “wireless’ reception, users will turn on “augmented reception.” How this works is quite logical: an object or image can be designated as a tag. An augmented app can scan an image as if it were a common QR code, which then links a specific app to a particular stream of information coming from the Internet Cloud. [1]

Jan Robert Leegte is among the first artists who were involved in the 90s NetArt movement. Since 1997, he creates art in the form of websites, which he connects to art historical movements such as minimalism, land art and conceptualism. Leegte also translates the themes of his work to offline media such as print, sculpture and projections. A reoccurring theme in his work is the sculptural materiality of interfaces of computer programs. Like the early graphic design of cursors, selection boxes and menu bars that were to give the user the impression of actually physically pressing the buttons with graphic shadows. Leegte often uses these components and by placing them in a new context, giving them their own, sculptural legitimacy. [1]

Brenna Murphy Module Generator Unit or Array Brenna Murphy Area Transduce Brenna Murphy Plant Transmitter Guide
Visible Cloaks & Brenna Murphy - Permutate Lex
MSHR - Wave Guide Edifice

Brenna Murphy (born 1986) is an American artist based in Portland, Oregon. Her works combine digital and physical input, combining psychedelic visual forms with three-dimensional objects. Murphy's work has been called strange, but with an "uncanny familiarity." Murphy thinks of herself as a channel that mediates between the digital and the physical. She privileges neither the physical nor the virtual and her sculptures are models of her net-based works as much as her net-based works are models of her sculptures. [1]

Her exhibition Liquid Vehicle Transmitters appeared at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, CA in 2013. The exhibit featured prints and physical representations of her internet-based work, forming "an interactive arena of labyrinthine sculptures". An auxiliary installation featured the audiovisual work of MSHR, her collaboration with Birch Cooper. Her work has been exhibited online via the New Museum and in group shows including This is what sculpture looks like, at the Postmasters Gallery in New York City. Her work has been collected in the book Domain~Lattice. [1]

Originally conceived as a digital effects and coding atelier and center for youth education, Eyebeam has become a center for the research, development, and curation of new media works of art and open source technology. Eyebeam annually hosts up to 20 residents and co-produces youth educational programs, exhibitions, performances, symposia, workshops, hackathons and other events with these residents as well as with partner organizations. Projects developed at Eyebeam have received awards and recognition including Webby Awards, Guggenheim Fellowships, and the Prix Ars Electronica. [1]

Eyebeam provides both space and support for a community of diverse, impact-driven artists. The residency program brings artists’ work to life and into the world by providing access to advanced tools and resources and launching dynamic public events, assisted by an engaged community of alumni.[2]

Now in its fourth edition, the Gray Area Festival is a unique global event focused on advancing open culture and the common good through holistic innovation and aesthetic practice. Our programming presents a survey of culture through the lens of art and technology, offering a deeper understanding of the present moment along with visions of the trails and opportunities ahead. Held at our Grand Theater in San Francisco's Mission district, the Festival highlights Gray Area's continued pursuit of integrated art and technology applied toward civic, educational, entrepreneurial, aesthetic, and social practice.[1]

Alexei Shulgin, born in 1963 in Moscow. Since mid 80’s e has been working in the fields of photography, media and contemporary arts. In the 90’s he was one of the pioneers of Net Art. His cyberpunk rock band, 386 DX has toured extensively all over the world. Alexei has participated in numerous exhibitions, media art and music festivals in Russia and internationally. He was teaching at Proarte Institute in St. Petersburg in 2000-2001 and performed as a guest teacher at a number of art schools in Europe and the US. Alexei has curated several exhibitions; in 2001-2004 he was a co-organizer of Readme software art festival (Moscow-Helsinki-Aarhus-Dortmund). He is a co-admin of Runme.org software art repository on the Internet. In 2004 he has co-founded Electroboutique gallery in Moscow. At present, he teaches at Rodchenko school of Photography and Media Art in Moscow. Alexei Shulgin lives and works in Moscow.[1]

Particularly involved with software art and internet art, he is a part of the readme culture and uses code as a form of art. In 1997, he released his first interactive work, Form Art, in which only minimum factors are programmed in the form of HTML. Shulgin describes this page as a "formalistic" aesthetic art site - a play on words taking into account the clean composition as well as the tools of its creation. Navigating this site requires aimless click-throughs of blank boxes and links, which lead the viewer through 19 pages of "form art" animations. Behavioral expectations are subverted by frequently overriding default functionality of basic form elements such as radio buttons and list boxes.[2]

Many links on his site are now 404, selected online works:

Codame Art + Tech Codame Logo designed by Vicente Montelongo Codame Art + Tech Codame Art+Tech Festival 2018 Codame Art + Tech Codame Art+Tech Festival 2013
Codame featured artists reel 2014

CODAME shapes the future through inspiring experiences and playful ART+TECH projects. CODAME events, installations, and workshops connect people of all specialties and backgrounds. Join us to continue the visionary celebration, running since 2010! [1]

Leveraging technology for creativity requires cultivation. By valuing questions over answers CODAME creates spaces encouraging exploration and discovery. Artists, entrepreneurs, innovators, amateurs, and leaders are all welcome on our journey. Startups, corporations, non-profits, and collectives alike have participated in CODAME style way-finding! [1]