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Open Filters

The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment was founded in 2011 as a non-profit dedicated to the preservation of our digital heritage in playable form, and to inspire the next generation of game developers. The MADE is a 501c3 non-profit. [1]

Despite having made a remarkable impact upon our modern culture, video games have largely been left out of the mainstream information preservation discussion. Aside from occasionally popping into the public consciousness, the day-to-day work of preserving our digital heritage in a form that can still be played is largely performed by loosely knit groupings of communities that operate somewhat outside the legal bounds of modern copyright laws. [1]

Thus, the MADE seeks to legitimize the preservation of video games as both a historic and artistic medium within the context of our time. Hence, visitors to the MADE can pay a single admission fee and then subsequently play any of our collection of over 12,000 games across 40 systems for as long as they may like. [1]

Rather than an arcade, the MADE is a bit more like a digital library, where research can be performed, history can be learned, and of course, flights of fancy and adventure can take place. [1]

Laboratory provides space and support for interactive art in Spokane, Washington. What is interactive art? We want to support artistic experiences that go beyond either ‘something on a wall’ or ‘something on a stage’. We’re interested in art that creates experiences, where the viewer/user is an integral part in their own experience, where they can touch, manipulate, and, well, interact with the stuff they’re seeing. We want people to feel that art is something that they’re a part of, not just something they look at from a distance and move on. [1]

Laboratory is focused specifically on supporting the development of interactive art. So, we’re interested in artists whose work changes or reacts to audience participation, the changing environment, or other sources of real-time data. Because of this, we tend to have a lot of people who do digital/new media work, but we try hard to be open to other media too. Is your project a wall of paint that people are encouraged to come up and smudge around? A sculpture to be climbed on? Great! Basically, anything that actively involves the viewer, or relies on some kind of data, we’re all for it. [2]

Founded in 1971, Trinity Square Video is one of Canada’s first artist-run centres and its oldest media arts centre. We are a not-for-profit, charitable organization.[1]

For 50 years, Trinity Square has been a champion of media arts practices. Our activities are guided by a goal to increase our members’ and audiences’ understanding and imagination of what media arts practices can be. Trinity Square strives to create supportive environments, encouraging artistic and curatorial experimentation that challenge medium specificity through education, production and presentation supports.[1]

As video-based practices have become increasingly present across disciplines, Trinity Square engages artists and curators in critical investigations into the changing conditions of perception, materiality and the virtual. We consider all of our artistic activities and structures through a process of critical self-reflection, continuously evaluating the ethical positioning of our programming, jury structures, inter-organizational relationships, et cetera. In addition to holding aesthetic worth in its own right, our artistic programming extends our education and production activities in order to generate new knowledges.[1]

Trinity Square’s programming is guided by three priorities: 1) promoting an expanded definition of media arts; 2) promoting the meaningful engagement of diverse voices in all levels of our operations; and 3) supporting and nurturing the production of new works by artists and curators. Our membership represents the diversity of the city and honours the original mandate of the organization—seeking to reduce barriers to access related to race, gender, sexual orientation, and socio- economic and physical ability. [1]

Denver Digerati is a nonprofit that supports artists working in digital animation and motion art. We believe in the freedom to create without restrictions. Denver Digerati promotes those who aspire to express their unique visions through their art. We produce content, manage equitable artist commissions, collaborate on community events, deliver education workshops, and host the annual Supernova Digital Animation Festival.[1]

Denver Digerati are leaders in the field of art integration with public LED and other display formats that position motion art and animation as a form of creative engagement. We provide a platform for artists and students through wider exposure to their work with the Supernova Digital Animation Festival, the first festival in the world dedicated exclusively to digital animation and motion art. [1]

Through Supernova and other initiatives, Denver Digerati provides compensation to artists through commissions and awards. We endeavor to reduce barriers to access and strive to foster an increased awareness of the medium through our educational opportunities and partnerships. We are dedicated to educating students and the public on the rapidly evolving field of tech based tools and how they can be wielded to create awe inspiring art. [1]

Denver Digerati originated with a passion for the outdoor exhibition of motion art on LED infrastructure by founder Ivar Zeile. The project has evolved into a non-profit arts organization with the desire to connect an international community of artists with opportunities to present their work in a variety of public and private settings, upholding the highest quality and standards. [1]

Indexical is dedicated to experimentation in music. Indexical engages the public in radical and unfamiliar work through performance, publication, documentation, educational initiatives, and discussion. We work with historically, culturally, and institutionally underrepresented artists and build community through long-term collaborative projects.[1]

Indexical has presented concerts since 2011, beginning in a converted chapel in Brooklyn and relocating in 2015 to Santa Cruz, California. Since moving to Santa Cruz, Indexical has presented over 75 performances, artist talks, participatory workshops, and large-scale public art events.[1]

In 2018, Indexical formed a 501c3 nonprofit organization with the intention of creating a permanent home for experimental music and art in Santa Cruz. In 2021, Indexical opened a brick-and-mortar venue and gallery space at the Tannery Arts Center in Santa Cruz, and projects hosting upwards of 40 performances over the coming season.[1]

Indexical’s programming is supported in part by the Vincent J. Coates Foundation, the Aaron Copland Fund for Music, the Arts Council of Santa Cruz County, the WHH Foundation, The Alice M. Ditson Fund of Columbia University, the City of Santa Cruz and the Santa Cruz Arts Commission, as well as over 60 individual donors.[1]

The Hand Eye Society is a Toronto not-for-profit dedicated to supporting and showcasing videogames made primarily as a form of creative expression. We aim to provide exhibition opportunities, education, creative support, mentorship, knowledge sharing and inspiration to artists, enthusiasts, and the game-curious in Toronto. Founded in 2009, it is one of the first videogame arts organizations of its kind in the world.[1]

Light Industry is a venue for film and electronic art in Brooklyn, New York.

Developed and overseen by Thomas Beard and Ed Halter, the project centers upon a series of weekly events, which are frequently organized in collaboration with an invited artist, critic, or curator.

Conceptually, Light Industry draws equal inspiration from the long history of alternative art spaces in New York as well its storied tradition of cinematheques and other intrepid film exhibitors. Through a regular program of screenings, performances, and lectures, its goal is to explore new models for the presentation of cinema. Bringing together the worlds of contemporary art, experimental film, and documentary (to name only a few), Light Industry looks to foster an ongoing dialogue among a wide range of artists and audiences within the city.[1]

Clocktower Productions is a non-profit art institution working in the visual arts, performance, music, and radio. Founded in 1972 in Lower Manhattan by MoMA PS1 Founder Alanna Heiss, Clocktower is the oldest alternative art project in New York, and its radio station, Clocktower Radio, was founded in 2003 as one of the first all-art online museum radio stations in the world. The institution functions as a laboratory for experimentation, working closely and collaboratively with artists, musicians, curators, writers and producers to develop, realize and present innovative and challenging work in all media, ranging from installation to performance and from experimental music to radio theater. By engaging both the physical resources of its partner organizations and Clocktower Radio’s access to a broad and international online audience, Clocktower disseminates experimental work to numerous communities, and promotes a rich cultural and social dialogue between artists, audiences, and institutions worldwide.[1]

Clocktower produces multidisciplinary art projects all over the city through creative collaborations with Pioneer Works in Red Hook, Knockdown Center in Queens, and Times Square Arts, Red Bull Studios, and Jones Day in Manhattan. These spaces host Clocktower exhibitions, performances, residencies, radio, and administrative activities. While Clocktower examines opportunities for a permanent long-term home, administrative offices are located in the Jones Day office building on East 41st Street, with a satellite studio for full-time radio production and broadcast at Pioneer Works, in Red Hook.[1]

Phase Space is a DIY makerspace, multimedia art studio, and experimental collective based in Brooklyn, NY.

We are dedicated to the exploration of video, sound, performance, creative coding, math + science, and interdisciplinary art practices.[1]

CultureHub is a global art and technology community that was born out of decades of collaboration between La MaMa and the Seoul Institute of the Arts, Korea’s first contemporary performing arts school. These two visionary institutions sought to explore how the internet and digital technologies could foster a more sustainable model for international exchange and creativity. [1]

Since its founding in 2009, CultureHub has grown into a global network with studios in New York, Los Angeles, Korea, Indonesia, and Italy, providing connected environments for artists to critically examine our evolving relationship to technology. Through residencies, live productions, and educational programming, CultureHub advances the work of artists experimenting with emerging technologies in search of new artistic forms. CultureHub builds new partnerships that expand our network and provide increased access to online and offline platforms that fuel artist mobility, create opportunities for cultural exchange, and broaden human understanding through the convergence of art, technology, and education. [1]