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Weirdcore 2016 looped "The Glass Eyes" by Radiohead made/shoot by Weirdcore Weirdcore Aphex Twin – Collapse Print, 2018
Interpreting Aphex Twin: The visual world of Collapse
2017 "Phase Magenta" + "Inulin" by Overmono video directed, shot & edited by Weirdcore & Overmono on XL records
Games - 'Shadows In Bloom', Directed by Weirdcore
Weirdcore Artist Talk
APHEX TWIN – COLLAPSE VIDEO 2018 video by Weirdcore

London based WEIRDCORE is half English, half French and results in a director and collaborator who is one hundred percent out there. [1]

Weirdcore’s work is the result of years of experimental design and animation work that pushes the boundaries of consciousness and visual interpretation. Adopting a method used more often by artists and music producers rather than by visual directors, Weirdcore helps both advise and visualise others initial ideas, facilitating their progress through until the finished form, whilst also creating his own stunning individual projects. With a unique blend of formats, colours, designs and mediums, Weirdcore has collaborated with some of the most exciting modern artists and directors such as Aphex Twin, M.I.A, Nabil, Hype Williams, Charlie XCX, Skrillex, Sophie Muller, Diane Martel and Miley Cyrus, in order to create innovative and groundbreaking videos, visuals, interactive installations and other projects. Weirdcore has also lent his emotive expertise to larger collectives, organisations and labels such as Warp, XL, Sony, Ninja Tunes and Domino, whilst keeping a dynamic and fluid focus across a range of other diverse industry’s such as Fashion, Theatre and Opera. [1]

Most recently, Weirdcore created a stunning CG world for Tame Impala’s “Cause I’m a Man” and is currently working alongside M.I.A.’s on her new album visuals. Drawing on elements that are highly structured, Weirdcore smashes conventional directorial ideas of where an image ends, paralleling universes seamlessly between 2D & 3D lending a one-of-a-kind twist to the graphic approach for videos, commercials, live visuals and fashion films. Weirdcore is driven by technology as an experimental exercise exploring artistic bipolarity with rough, raw style, hip yet always organic and with a definitive edge. [1]

Though he has achieved a level of success in his field, it's probably comforting to the musicians he works with that he views himself as a support unit to their own ideas. "I realize that when I speak to real artists like Florian Hecker or MIA, if I ask them questions as to why they do certain things, their answers are so deep or subjective, where I don't think like that at all," he explains. "I'm much more logical and straightforward, and all of my graphics are purely about aesthetics. No story or meaning to them, just purely about bold impact and causing a reaction. As far as I'm concerned, despite being very passionate about it all, I'm far too logical and driven by briefs and deadlines to be considered an artist." [2]

Tabor Robak A* (2014) Tabor Robak A* (2014) Tabor Robak Blossom (2018) Tabor Robak Where's My Water (2015) Tabor Robak Butterfly Room (2015)
Xenix (2013)
Quantaspectra at Team Gallery NYC
SI: Visions | Tabor Robak on Video Games

Tabor Robak is an American artist working in video art and electronics including live-rendering 3D graphics and custom built PC graphics installations.

Robak's early works consisted of 3D interactive environments, to be accessed on the artist's website. These pieces, which the artist described as having a "desktop screensaver aesthetic," sought to isolate digital space as a fact, an abstracted, alternate reality. Robak's work explores the visual vocabulary of modern video games, advertising and animated film, to examine societal perceptions of the digital and the real.[1]

Brenna Murphy Module Generator Unit or Array Brenna Murphy Area Transduce Brenna Murphy Plant Transmitter Guide
Visible Cloaks & Brenna Murphy - Permutate Lex
MSHR - Wave Guide Edifice

Brenna Murphy (born 1986) is an American artist based in Portland, Oregon. Her works combine digital and physical input, combining psychedelic visual forms with three-dimensional objects. Murphy's work has been called strange, but with an "uncanny familiarity." Murphy thinks of herself as a channel that mediates between the digital and the physical. She privileges neither the physical nor the virtual and her sculptures are models of her net-based works as much as her net-based works are models of her sculptures. [1]

Her exhibition Liquid Vehicle Transmitters appeared at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, CA in 2013. The exhibit featured prints and physical representations of her internet-based work, forming "an interactive arena of labyrinthine sculptures". An auxiliary installation featured the audiovisual work of MSHR, her collaboration with Birch Cooper. Her work has been exhibited online via the New Museum and in group shows including This is what sculpture looks like, at the Postmasters Gallery in New York City. Her work has been collected in the book Domain~Lattice. [1]

One of the most important collectives to emerge in the last decade, Paper Rad exploded at the edge of a cultural time zone—before the social web—when subculture was still palpable and also clearly becoming impossible to sustain. They emerged in the early ’00s within a community dedicated to DIY art practice that had strong roots in Providence, Rhode Island, as well as cities like Detroit, Baltimore, Boston, and towns in Western Massachusetts became known for a cartoon cosmos that felt like a psychedelic, subversive response to American pop culture that was hatched out of a sincere and deep engagement to it. Their work began with ’zines and music, and eventually grew to encompass digital animation, videos, installations, and their website—paperrad.org—which became an increasingly central part of their work as it drew attention and followers. [1]

… the page was changed daily, continually layered with new content or reorganized spatially. Amid this constant development, there are a few distinguishing elements to the website that endured throughout its seven-year life. First, it carried over the DIY ethos and aesthetics from the culture from which it emerged—paperrad.org was not an easy-to-navigate online artist’s CV but existed more like a maze of found, remixed, and original content. Visitors were only able to track the identities of participating members through deep research, which lent the site a mysterious and open feel, as if Paper Rad could be as small as one person or as large as a thriving subculture. A second distinguishing factor was that Paper Rad created their own discreet world that blended influences from both analog and digital culture. In the Paper Rad cosmos, hacked and re-versioned My Little Ponies mingled with animated gifs and characters originally rendered in printed ’zines, like Tux Dog, which were digitized and made open source. This straddling of different pop cultural realms—television and the internet, mass media and amateur media—became a trademark of Paper Rad, as did a disregard for medium specificity. The Paper Rad website, presenting recycled cartoon characters like Gumby in Flash animation sagas, was evidence of the eroding boundaries between media we are so familiar with today. [1]

Paper Rad's visual projects often employ bright fluorescent palettes juxtaposed with primary colors to create a distinctive "lo-fi" look. It adopts a variety of techniques and elements to achieve this look, including pop art, collage, punk art, as well as imagery from popular culture. The multimedia projects incorporate MIDI audio, poor recordings of original sound effects and voices, pixelization, and other crude audio and visual components. Paper Rad recycled or appropriated obscure sounds and images from a variety of sources, including old cartoons, commercials, and late-night television. [2]

The collective–which consisted of siblings Jessica and Jacob Ciocci, Ben Jones, and other collaborators–cultivated a unique interest in exploring artistic strategies from other media, especially comics and zines, through web-based and multimedia works. Serially updated during the group’s most active period (2001-2008), paperrad.org was both an archive and a artwork, a riot of brightly colored compositions featuring graphics and a mazelike compilation of characters from otherwise overlooked aspects of ’70s and ’80s pop culture. [3]

Paper Rad Homepages 01-08 Collected by Rhizome

Selected Webpages