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Stan Vanderbeek Stan VanDerBeek in front of his environmental movie theatre Movie-Drome at Stoney Point, New York, c. 1966

Stan VanDerBeek (January 6, 1927 – September 19, 1984) was an American experimental filmmaker known for his collage works. [1]

A pioneer in the development of experimental film and live-action animation techniques, Stan VanDerBeek achieved widespread recognition in the American avant-garde cinema. An advocate of the application of a utopian fusion of art and technology, he began making films in 1955. In the 1960s, he produced theatrical, multimedia pieces and computer animation, often working in collaboration with Bell Telephone Laboratories. In the 1970s, he constructed a 'Movie Drome' in Stony Point, New York, which was an audiovisual laboratory for the projection of film, dance, magic theater, sound and other visual effects. His multimedia experiments included movie murals, projection systems, planetarium events and the exploration of early computer graphics and image-processing systems.[1]

VanDerBeek wrote: It is imperative that we quickly find some way for the entire level of world human understanding to rise to a new human scale. The scale is the world' The risks are the life or death of this world. The technological explosion of this last half-century, and the implied future are overwhelming, man is running the machines of his own invention… while the machine that is man… runs the risk of running wild. Technological research, development, and involvement of the world community has almost completely out-distanced the emotional-sociological (socio-'logical') comprehension of this technology. The 'technique-power' and 'culture-over-reach' that is just beginning to explode in many parts of the earth, is happening so quickly that it has put the logical fulcrum of man’s intelligence so far outside himself that he cannot judge or estimate the results of his acts before he commits them. The process of life as an experiment on earth has never been made clearer. It is this danger — that man does not have time to talk to himself — that man does not have the means to talk to other men. The world hangs by a thread of verbs and nouns. Language and cultural-semantics are as explosive as nuclear energy. It is imperative that we (the world’s artists) invent a new world language…'[1]

Cornelia Sollfrank is an artist who pioneered Net Art and Cyberfeminism in the 1990s.

In 1997 Sollfrank hacked the "world's first" net art competition, Extension, organized by the Hamburg Art Museum in Germany. Her work titled Female Extension involved the creation of 289 computer-generated websites created by combing the Internet and combining fragments of HTML into exquisite corpse-like websites. Each website was submitted under the name of a different artificial female artist. No women were awarded prizes, but press releases distributed by Sollfrank received widespread attention for her intervention, overshadowing the gallery's own awards.

Cornelia Sollfrank founded the organization Old Boys Network. In 1997, it organized the Cyberfeminist International at documenta x in Kassel, Germany. Old Boys Network published First Cyberfeminist International in 1998 followed by next Cyberfeminist International in 1999. Closely associated with Cyberfeminism, Sollfrank has expressed reservations that it limits the perception of her work as "womens issues". [1]

Weirdcore 2016 looped "The Glass Eyes" by Radiohead made/shoot by Weirdcore Weirdcore Aphex Twin – Collapse Print, 2018
Interpreting Aphex Twin: The visual world of Collapse
2017 "Phase Magenta" + "Inulin" by Overmono video directed, shot & edited by Weirdcore & Overmono on XL records
Games - 'Shadows In Bloom', Directed by Weirdcore
Weirdcore Artist Talk
APHEX TWIN – COLLAPSE VIDEO 2018 video by Weirdcore

London based WEIRDCORE is half English, half French and results in a director and collaborator who is one hundred percent out there. [1]

Weirdcore’s work is the result of years of experimental design and animation work that pushes the boundaries of consciousness and visual interpretation. Adopting a method used more often by artists and music producers rather than by visual directors, Weirdcore helps both advise and visualise others initial ideas, facilitating their progress through until the finished form, whilst also creating his own stunning individual projects. With a unique blend of formats, colours, designs and mediums, Weirdcore has collaborated with some of the most exciting modern artists and directors such as Aphex Twin, M.I.A, Nabil, Hype Williams, Charlie XCX, Skrillex, Sophie Muller, Diane Martel and Miley Cyrus, in order to create innovative and groundbreaking videos, visuals, interactive installations and other projects. Weirdcore has also lent his emotive expertise to larger collectives, organisations and labels such as Warp, XL, Sony, Ninja Tunes and Domino, whilst keeping a dynamic and fluid focus across a range of other diverse industry’s such as Fashion, Theatre and Opera. [1]

Most recently, Weirdcore created a stunning CG world for Tame Impala’s “Cause I’m a Man” and is currently working alongside M.I.A.’s on her new album visuals. Drawing on elements that are highly structured, Weirdcore smashes conventional directorial ideas of where an image ends, paralleling universes seamlessly between 2D & 3D lending a one-of-a-kind twist to the graphic approach for videos, commercials, live visuals and fashion films. Weirdcore is driven by technology as an experimental exercise exploring artistic bipolarity with rough, raw style, hip yet always organic and with a definitive edge. [1]

Though he has achieved a level of success in his field, it's probably comforting to the musicians he works with that he views himself as a support unit to their own ideas. "I realize that when I speak to real artists like Florian Hecker or MIA, if I ask them questions as to why they do certain things, their answers are so deep or subjective, where I don't think like that at all," he explains. "I'm much more logical and straightforward, and all of my graphics are purely about aesthetics. No story or meaning to them, just purely about bold impact and causing a reaction. As far as I'm concerned, despite being very passionate about it all, I'm far too logical and driven by briefs and deadlines to be considered an artist." [2]

Eva and Franco Mattes (both born in Italy in 1976) are a duo of artists based in New York City. Since meeting in Berlin in 1994, they have never separated. Operating under the pseudonym 0100101110101101.org, they are counted among the pioneers of the Net Art movement and are renowned for their subversion of public media.[1] They produce art involving the ethical and political issues arising from the inception of the Internet. The work investigates the fabrication of situations, where fact and fiction merge into one. They are based in Brooklyn, New York, but also travel frequently throughout Europe and the United States.[1]

Manfred Mohr is considered a pioneer of digital art based on algorithms. After discovering Prof. Max Bense's information aesthetics in the early 1960's, Mohr's artistic thinking was radically changed. Within a few years, his art transformed from abstract expressionism to computer generated algorithmic geometry. Further encouraged by discussions with the computer music composer Pierre Barbaud whom he met in 1967, Mohr programmed his first computer drawings in 1969. Since then all his artwork is produced exclusively with the computer. Mohr develops and writes algorithms for his visual ideas. Since 1973, he generates 2-D semiotic graphic constructs using multidimensional hypercubes. [1]

References: 1. https://www.emohr.com/

Marpi is a Polish-born, San Francisco-based artist who creates interactive, scalable work across multiple platforms in digital and physical space. In his current practice, he designs and builds vast digital ecosystems that encompass both environments and creatures that are brought into being and shaped by users. His recent work provides different windows into the same universe, where sound, gestures, and other inputs from our world provide the basis for completely new forms of life.[1]

Marpi creates work through Marpi Studios. He works with a small network of creative collaborators - designers, technologists, musicians, and others - to create exhibits, events, and other commissions throughout the world.[1]

References: 1. https://marpi.pl/about/

Peter Burr is an artist from Brooklyn specializing in animation and installation. Using computer animation to create images and environments that hover on the boundary between abstraction and figuration, Burr has in recent years devoted himself to exploring the concept of an endlessly mutating labyrinth. Existing as stand-alone pieces, much of his work is also in the process of expanding into a video game through the support of Creative Capital and Sundance. Previously, he worked under the alias Hooliganship, and in 2006 founded the video label Cartune Xprez, through which he produced hundreds of live multimedia exhibitions and touring programs showcasing a multi-generational group of artists at the forefront of experimental animation. Here he discusses ways to stay healthy as a creator, what it means to make art in the digital realm, and the plant-like possibilities of games.[1]

Natalie Jeremijenko (born 1966) is an artist and engineer whose background includes studies in biochemistry, physics, neuroscience and precision engineering. She is an active member of the net.art movement, and her work primarily explores the interface between society, the environment and technology. She has alternatively described her work as "X Design" (short for experimental design) and herself as a "thingker", a combination of thing-maker and thinker. She is currently an associate professor at New York University in the Visual Art Department, and has affiliated faculty appointments in the school's Computer Science and Environmental Studies.[1] She directs the Environmental Health Clinic at New York University, which is modeled on the health clinic model, but offers patients prescriptions not for pharmaceuticals but for art, design and participatory projects. [2]

Reconnoitre is the artist duo of Gavin Baily and Tom Corby. Since the 1990s they have collaborated on artworks, texts and research that broadly explore intersections of environmental, technological and social processes. Recent work includes the use of information from the climate, meteorological and geological record to visually condense the aleatory and hidden aspects of environmental sites and landscape, and the employment of social media platforms to produce speculative geographies and experimental maps. At the heart of much of this work is an interest in data, employed as a medium beyond a conventional analytics approach, but which stresses its critical, experiential and affective potential.[1]

Tabor Robak A* (2014) Tabor Robak A* (2014) Tabor Robak Blossom (2018) Tabor Robak Where's My Water (2015) Tabor Robak Butterfly Room (2015)
Xenix (2013)
Quantaspectra at Team Gallery NYC
SI: Visions | Tabor Robak on Video Games

Tabor Robak is an American artist working in video art and electronics including live-rendering 3D graphics and custom built PC graphics installations.

Robak's early works consisted of 3D interactive environments, to be accessed on the artist's website. These pieces, which the artist described as having a "desktop screensaver aesthetic," sought to isolate digital space as a fact, an abstracted, alternate reality. Robak's work explores the visual vocabulary of modern video games, advertising and animated film, to examine societal perceptions of the digital and the real.[1]