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Open Filters

VHS provides a physical space where people can gather to share ideas, equipment, opinions, and beer. Members work on personal projects, collaborate with others, and learn new skills. More than just a studio space, we focus on sharing all sorts of knowledge within a friendly and collaborative atmosphere. VHS is the community garage for a community without garages.[1]

Many of our members share an interest in 3D printers, laser cutting, machining, crafting, electronics, robotics, programming, electronic music, and art. We welcome anyone with skills to share or an interest in learning, and strive to be as open as possible in everything we do.[1]

Named DCTRL–pronounced “decontrol”–the location is a radical, artist-run basement that has acted as the crucible for the majority of the city’s blockchain companies. Local hacktivists debate ideas in a central room with well-worn, movable couches; congregate in a small jam space with a free-for-use keyboard and rudimentary soundproofing; and sit quietly in a separate, disorderly area earmarked for coding. The walls are covered with haphazard meme-related murals, and the washroom is marked with a sign that reads “cemetery.”[1]

The space, newcomers are told, is a do-ocracy: an organizational structure that lets individuals choose their own tasks independently. It’s part of the location’s aim to translate blockchain’s ideology of decentralization into the lives of its visitors. It’s also one of the reasons that Vancouver’s blockchain community is unique.[1]

VIVO Media Arts Centre, a member of British Columbia Museums Association, brings together artists, video and filmmakers, researchers and activists interested in the history of video-making and its evolution towards the art form. VIVO’s educational program extends beyond the boundaries of video distribution and video archiving. The workshops program offers beginner and intermediate level classes on programming, projection mapping, lighting, sound recording by local experts. VIVO accepts research applications to work closely with the Crista Dahl Media Library and Archive thus contributing to the local and international art and research community and encouraging curatorial collaborations.[1]

VIVO’s mandate is to directly support artists and independent community-based producers to develop, exchange, and disseminate their skills in a supportive environment through accessible services and programs. Our vision is a robust, diverse, and vibrant media arts sector: a catalyst for critical and innovative engagement with the material forms and cultural meanings of media and technology. VIVO’s programs offer a broad range of services and opportunities to artists and the public. They include:

  • Access to the material necessities for quality production through affordable equipment rentals, editing 
facilities, software, and production space.
  • A broad range of skill development and education opportunities that encourage the exploration of 
technology and aesthetics within a critical, artistic framework.
  • Public programming: events, exhibitions, residencies, co-productions, and critical forums.
  • International distribution, work exchange, and media art preservation which supports the aspirations and 
livelihood of artists.
  • Western Canada’s largest public reference library and archive of media art, independent video, and 
related publications, documents, audio recordings, and photographs.

[2]

New Forms Media Society (NFMS) is a non-profit society and media arts organization founded in 2000 that exists to unite creative communities, push artistic and conceptual boundaries, and explore digital media as an art form. By producing the annual New Forms Festival (NFF) as well as a growing schedule of year-round public presentations, we aim to raise the profile of Canadian artists, media arts, underground and subversive arts movements and practices both in Canada and abroad. NFMS is dedicated to showcasing innovative media works that generate a critical and creative discourse within the public sphere.

By promoting Canadian artists in collaboration with the international arts and technology world, New Forms facilitates multimodal art works and engages in discussion on their role in our cultural environment. Since its inception, an integral element of New Forms is the recognition of independent and groundbreaking artists. The New Forms Festival aims to showcase and increase awareness of these artists and their work within our community and beyond by promoting them within a larger milieu.

New Forms Festival is part of a larger, international, multi-media festival movement, which explores the ever changing and evolving world of art and creates a platform for artistic growth. The Society’s goal is to make new media art, music, film, technology-based installation and performance accessible to a wider audience. [1]