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Established in 2004, Secret Project Robot is a 501c3 not for profit artist run art space with a gallery which hosts art installations, music, performance art, gatherings, happenings, craft nights, parties, dj's and much more. In 2017, the founders and co-conspirators created a new bar and hangout within Secret Project Robot to help fund the space and employee artists. [1]

VISION

Secret Project Robot aims to integrate and overlap all the arts into a fluid, artful, casual, friendly environment, to create a perpetual happening and a kind of house party that is run and supported by the people participating.

Secret Project Robot seeks to build a strong artist, musician, and intellectual community as a tangible way to mitigate the feelings of alienation brought on by tyranny and a failing world order created by the neo-liberal capitalist system.

Secret Project Robot desires to be a fully self sustaining artist run art space. Using sales from the Bar we are aiming to create a new way to run and communally finance an art space and art. [1]

Whitney Artport Whitney Artport Ursula Endlicher, Light and Dark Networks, 2011.
Hear from curator Christiane Paul and artists Mendi and Keith Obadike, Andy Deck, and Katherine Moriwaki and Jonah Brucker-Cohen about the history of net art at the Whitney Museum.

Artport is the Whitney Museum's portal to Internet art and an online gallery space for commissions of net art and new media art. Originally launched in 2001, Artport provides access to original art works commissioned specifically for Artport by the Whitney, documentation of net art and new media art exhibitions at the Whitney, and new media art in the Museum's collection. [1]

Founded in 2001, bitforms gallery represents established, mid-career, and emerging artists critically engaged with new technologies. Spanning the rich history of media art through its current developments, the gallery’s program offers an incisive perspective on the fields of digital, internet, time-based, and new media art forms. [1]

Supporting and advocating for the collection of ephemeral, time-based, and digital art works since its founding, bitforms gallery artists are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; Center for Art and Media (ZKM), Karlsruhe; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul, among other institutions internationally.

Originally conceived as a digital effects and coding atelier and center for youth education, Eyebeam has become a center for the research, development, and curation of new media works of art and open source technology. Eyebeam annually hosts up to 20 residents and co-produces youth educational programs, exhibitions, performances, symposia, workshops, hackathons and other events with these residents as well as with partner organizations. Projects developed at Eyebeam have received awards and recognition including Webby Awards, Guggenheim Fellowships, and the Prix Ars Electronica. [1]

Eyebeam provides both space and support for a community of diverse, impact-driven artists. The residency program brings artists’ work to life and into the world by providing access to advanced tools and resources and launching dynamic public events, assisted by an engaged community of alumni.[2]

Codame Art + Tech Codame Logo designed by Vicente Montelongo Codame Art + Tech Codame Art+Tech Festival 2018 Codame Art + Tech Codame Art+Tech Festival 2013
Codame featured artists reel 2014

CODAME shapes the future through inspiring experiences and playful ART+TECH projects. CODAME events, installations, and workshops connect people of all specialties and backgrounds. Join us to continue the visionary celebration, running since 2010! [1]

Leveraging technology for creativity requires cultivation. By valuing questions over answers CODAME creates spaces encouraging exploration and discovery. Artists, entrepreneurs, innovators, amateurs, and leaders are all welcome on our journey. Startups, corporations, non-profits, and collectives alike have participated in CODAME style way-finding! [1]

NYC Resistor NYC Resistor Logo NYC Resistor

NYC Resistor is a hackerspace in New York, inspired by Chaos Computer Club and other hacker organizations. According to the NYC Resistor's website, "NYC Resistor is a hacker collective with a shared space located in downtown Brooklyn. We meet regularly to share knowledge, hack on projects together, and build community." [1]

NYC Resistor encourages participation by anyone who feels they can contribute. Nonmembers are welcome to attend Craft Nights and other public events, as well as take part in classes on a variety of subjects. Visiting beyond this can be arranged on a case by case basis with current members. [1]

SPEKTRUM is a space of convergence for cultural communities and transdisciplinary groups emerging and operating in and off Berlin. The project aims to bring confrontation, open knowledge and a platforms for idealisation, realisation and presentation of technology-based artworks, science-focused events and futuristic utopias based on the principle “do-it-together-with-others”. Above all, we are an open organization promoting participatory processes to co-define and co-design a social and physical playground for curiosity and critical understanding. [1]

The venue is part of a monumental architecture in the heart of Kreuzberg/Neukölln realised by Franz Hoffmann and Bruno Taut, one of the main expressionist architects of the modernist period. The inner space is characterised by a multi-layered approach to heights, with an unusual 5 meter high ceiling for the event room and other sections organised as split-levels. These architectural qualities tell us a story of planes and volumes, offering guests a surprising walk around with secret spots to discover. [1]

Rhizome champions born-digital art and culture through commissions, exhibitions, digital preservation, and software development. Founded by artist Mark Tribe as a listserve including some of the first artists to work online, Rhizome has played an integral role in the history of contemporary art engaged with digital technologies and the internet. Since 2003, Rhizome has been an affiliate in residence at the New Museum in New York City.[1]

Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center is an artist-run, non-profit, media arts center based in Buffalo, New York. Founded in 1985, the organization provides the Western New York region with low-cost media equipment rentals, media arts education for youth and adults, residencies for artists and researchers, and exhibitions, screenings, and other public programming. [1]

Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center has a mission to continue a legacy of innovation in media arts through access, education, and exhibition. We envision a community that uses electronic media and film to celebrate freedom of expression and diversity of voice.

Established in 1985, Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center is the only organization in Western NY to offer education, equipment access, and exhibition programming dedicated to exploring film & digital media arts. Squeaky Wheel’s reputation in the media arts field continues to grow nationally and internationally. We have won awards for Best Workshops of Any Kind (2010); Best Curation (2012); Best Youth Workshops (2013) from regional publication, Buffalo Spree Magazine of Western New York. In 2014, the Arts Services Initiative of Western New York nominated Squeaky Wheel “Cultural Organization of the Year”. [2]

Mute is an online magazine dedicated to exploring culture and politics after the net. Mute combines biannual issues dedicated to specific topics (Precarious Labour, The Knowledge Commons, etc) with regularly updated articles and reviews. The site also features ongoing coverage of relevant news and events contributed by ourselves and our readers.

As well as the online magazine, Mute also publishes a biannual magazine in print (aka Mute Vol. 3), which features selections from current issues together with other online content, specially commissioned and co-published projects.

Mute magazine was founded in 1994 to discuss the interrelationship of art and new technologies when the World Wide Web was newborn. But, as mass participation in computer mediated communications has become more integral to contemporary capitalism, its coverage has expanded to engage with the broader implications of this shift. Mute’s investigation of the social, economic, political and cultural formations of ‘network societies’ maintains an accent on the relationship between technology and the production of new social relations. At the same time, the magazine’s remit has grown broader and now includes analyses of geopolitics, culture and contemporary labour that, while necessarily inflected by contemporary developments in technology, go far beyond this.

While Mute was born out of a culture that celebrated the democratising potential of new media, it becomes ever more apparent that we need to critically engage with the ways in which new media also reproduce and extend capitalist social relations. Mute invites its readers and writers to consider new possibilities for resistance to hegemonies wherever they find them, from socio-economic and technical structures, to codes of representation and enunciation, to the production and articulation of psychic experience and beyond. We also welcome critiques of the contemporary fetishisation of ICT as either inherently progressive or entirely reactionary. Finally, Mute hopes to stimulate approaches to art and politics that challenge the orthodoxies of both the constituted left and ‘critical’ new media culture. [1]