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From julianoliver.com:

Julian Oliver is a New Zealander, Critical Engineer and artist based in Berlin. His work and lectures have been presented at many museums, galleries, international electronic-art events and conferences, including the Tate Modern, Transmediale, the Chaos Computer Congress, Ars Electronica, FILE and the Japan Media Arts Festival. Julian has received several awards, most notably the distinguished Golden Nica at Prix Ars Electronica 2011 for the project Newstweek (with Daniil Vasiliev). He is the co-author of the Critical Engineering Manifesto and co-founder of Crypto Party in Berlin, who’s shared studio Weise7 hosted the first three crypto-parties worldwide. He is also the co-founder of BLACKLIST, a screening and panel series focused on the primary existential threats of our time.

Radical Networks is a conference that celebrates the free and open Internet, with hands-on workshops, speakers, and a gallery exhibiting artworks centered around radio and networking technology. It fosters critical discussion on contemporary issues that include surveillance, the spread of misinformation, ownership of personal data, and the increasing opacity of “The Cloud”.

Radical Networks is also an arts festival that considers networking technology as an artistic medium, featuring works that run the gamut from ethical hacks to creative experiments to live performances. [1]

From Hackers of Resistance:

The Hackers of Resistance (HORs) is a queer transfeminist hacker collective of artists, activists, researchers, cyborgs, witches, and technologists, of color. Co-conspirators, we build tools to defend our community, educate people to be secure, to demand and make ourselves heard, to fight back and hack tools of oppression. H0Rh0use is 0ur imm3rsive mUltim3dia heisT.

From Ada Gender New Media & Technology:

Hackers of Resistance (HORs) is a hyperreal-multimedia-installation-performance-video-game reimagining feminist activism. It’s immersive theater, video installation, and game design—but mostly, it’s a universe. A power fantasy of the oppressed, we subvert traditionally-white-American-centered dystopian narratives by placing WoC hackers as superheroes willing to risk it all for solidarity (our vision of utopia). Our stylized hyperreality uses shimmery-neon aesthetics, socially-aware comedy, and DIY charm to address serious concerns like the fate of minorities in the hands of the current administration. Some of the projects the HORs are developing and tinkering with are cybersecurity labs, anti-facial recognition, counter-surveillance, social engineering, bio-hacking, dildo-hacking, and DIWO 3D printable abortion kits in collaboration with our incarcerated sister organization Marias Clandestinas.

From transparencygrenade.com:

Equipped with a tiny computer, microphone and powerful wireless antenna, the Transparency Grenade captures network traffic and audio at the site and securely and anonymously streams it to a dedicated server where it is mined for information. User names, hostnames, IP addresses, unencrypted email fragments, web pages, images and voice extracted from this data and then presented on an online, public map, shown at the location of the detonation.

The volatility of information in networked, digital contexts frames a precedent for clamouring (and often unrealistic) attempts to contain it. This increasingly influences how we use networks and think about the right to information itself; today we see the fear of the leak actively exploited by law makers to afford organisations greater opacity and thus control..

This anxiety, this 'network insecurity', impacts not just upon the freedom of speech but the felt instinct to speak at all. It would now seem letting public know what's going on inside a publicly funded organisation is somehow to do 'wrong' -Bradley Manning a sacrificial lamb to that effect..

Meanwhile, civil servants and publicly-owned companies continue to make decisions behind guarded doors that impact the lives of many, often leaving us feeling powerless to effect change, both in and out of a democratic context.

The Transparency Grenade seeks to capture these important tensions in an iconic, hand-held package while simultaneously opening up a conversation about just how much implicit trust we place in network infrastructure; infrastructure that reaches ever more deeply into our lives.